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Archive for October, 2011





Cham’s, Penshoppe top DTI’s Bagwis Awards
Read 737 times | Posted on October 31, 2011 @ 7 years ago


Dr. Johnny U. Lu, president of the Cham’s chain of convenience stores, receives the DTI Bagwis Silver Award for some 10 of the chains establishments during awarding ceremonies held Friday, 28 October 2011 at Pearlmont Hotel from DTI ARD Linda Boniao and Mike Baños, president of Konsumenteng Kagay-anon as part of the regional technical screening committee. With Dr. Lu is Cham’s Operations Manager Victor G. Ocampo and other members of the regional technical screening committee. photo by henry dy

Convenience shop Cham’s and specialty store Penshoppe dominated this year’s awarding of the Department of Trade and Industry’s Bagwis Awards held 28 October 2011 at Pearlmont Hotel.

According to DTI-10 Asst. Regional Director Linda O. Boniao, the Bagwis Awards aim to recognize establishments that sell only quality products which comply with all trade and industry laws, encourage them to establish “consumer welfare desks” and recognize their efforts in maintaining quality and environmental systems.

The Bagwis Awards cover all business establishments nationwide which fall under the following categories: Category 1 (Supermarkets), Category 2 (Department Stores), Category 3 (Appliance Centers), Category 4 (Hardware Stores), and Category 5 (DTI Accredited Service and Repair Shops).

A total of 53 establishments in Region 10 were awarded the Bagwis Awards in various categories during the awarding ceremonies: 14 were awarded the coveted Gold Bagwis, 26 were awarded Silver and 13 establishments the Bronze.

Eight of Penshoppe’s outlets including boutiques in Gaisano City, CDO & Iligan, Limketkai Mall, SM Cagayan de Oro and stand-alone stores in Iligan, Malaybalay, Ozamiz and Valencia cities were recognized with the coveted Gold Bagwis Award.

On the other hand, Cham’s Convenience Store dominated the Silver category of the Bagwis Awards with no less than ten of its outlets garnering the equally coveted Silver rating (Patag, Carmen, Kauswagan, Corrales Extension, Corrales Avenue, Osmeña St., Macasandig, Tomas Saco, R.N. Abejuela and Nazareth).

“It’s an honor to receive the Bagwis Silver Awards for ten of our stores and it inspires us to do better in handling customers and continuing improvements on how to be more effective in terms of customer care and solving their minor problems with Cham’s policy,” Dr. Johnny U. Lu, president of Cham’s Convenience Stores said after receiving the recognition.

Other multiple awardees included LBC Express (Yacapin, Capistrano, Divisoria), Mercury Drug (grocery/Bulua, Gusa, Puerto) and Citi Hardware Bacolod (Tablon, Bulua).
“Awardees at all levels will be recognized with the publication of their names in local media, special mention during information campaigns and the distribution of their names to their respective affiliated associations, “ said Engr. Elvira A. Cajigas, chief of DTI-X’s Consumer Welfare Division.

Other Gold Bagwis Awardees for 2011 included For Me and Oxygen, both located in Limketkai Mall) and SM Department Store, Our Home, Toy Kingdom and Ace Hardware, all located in SM Cagayan de Oro.

Other Bagwis Silver Awardees for 2011 included RPS Engineering Services in Malaybalay City, Norkis Distributors, Inc. in Mambajao, Camiguin; Macbil 888 Venture Corp, FJK Trading and Pinnacle Uniwide Business, all in Ozamiz City and Neopace, Inc., Oro Graphics Inc., Solidmark, Inc., all in Cagayan de Oro City.

However, the Certification Committee may cancel or revoke the seal if the awardee is found to have sold or kept an inventory of uncertified products covered by mandatory certification such as electrical products or fire extinguishers; sold pirated products or failed to comply with applicable fair trade laws.

“The cancellation and removal of the seal from the establishment shall only be lifted after the outlet has done corrective measures within one (1) year from the cancellation or removal of the seal,” said Almer R. Masillones, chief of the consumer welfare division in DTI Misamis Oriental.

Establishments in Misamis Occidental dominated this year’s Bagwis Bronze Awardees: SBU General Services, Lagar Enterprises, Getzme Bagshoppe, Mitadeel Enterprises, Oroquieta Construction Supply, Inc., P&G Commercial Enterprises and A-3 Car Services Shop, all in Oroquieta City; and Goldsquare General Merchandise and Quality Shopping Center, both in Ozamiz City.

Other Bagwis Bronze awardees for 2011 included J&J Sto. Niño Enterprises in Malaybalay City, Tee Enterprises in Mambajao, Camiguin and Mercury Drug (grocery) in Carmen and Cagayan Educational Supply, both in Cagayan de Oro.

“We are inspired as consumers that an increasing number of our establishments in Region 10 are making extra efforts to improve their services to the customer and comply with the Fair Price Act,” said Mike Baños, president of Konsumanteng Kagay-anon, Inc. (KKI) in his closing remarks. “For our part, we shall help DTI-10 disseminate this list to all our members so they would be aware which stores around the region offer them fair prices and good customer service.”(RMB)



Thanksgiving bash for Miss Kagay-an beauties
Read 568 times | Posted on October 31, 2011 @ 7 years ago

By JOE PALABAO
Correspondent

THE Department of Tourism in Region 10 feted the candidates of the recent search for Miss Kagay-an 2011 to a Thanksgiving Party at the Mallberry Suites Hotel last Oct. 24 for its success that gave color to this year’s city fiesta celebration.

Among those invited were the production staff of the pageant, invited guests, and media partners who helped a lot for its tremendous success.

With a Hawaiian motif, Miss Kagay-an 2011 winners exude their natural and charming beauties. Present were the Reigning Miss Kagay-an 2011-Angel Carbajal, Ms. Kagay-an Tourism 2011-Ms. Jamie Joy Bantique now a host of ABS-CBN Pamahaw Espesyal, runners-up Christel Valdehueza, Elaine Roselle Aquino and April Darlin Jane B. Hernandez. Ms. Hanna Melissa Aleman Cagas-Best in Swim Wear , Ms. Joanna Grace Daaca. Former Kagay-an beauties, Ms. Chiery Ladera-runner up Miss Kagay-an 2009 and Ms. Jeminah Ferrer runner up Miss Kagay-an 2010 were also present during the Thanksgiving Party.

DOT Regional Director Butch E. Chan 111, who is now on leave, also graced the occasion.

Present were DOT-10 staff, guests from LBC, Promote CDO, Business Week Publisher Dante Sudaria, representatives from Sun Star, Jules of Regatta Tours Asia and staff, Iconic Fashion Designer Mark Christopher Yaranon who designed the gowns of Miss Kagay-an 2011 beauties and incidentally the Stage Designer. A representative from UKC Builders, multi-talented host Yoyong Esmedalla of DOT X together with debonair pageant host Edzen Espina. COHARA was represented by Ms. Nelia Lee-Manager of Dynasty Court Hotel and Lady Manager of Casa Crystalla.

Jojo Roque, pageant coordinator, played host during the party. Guests enjoyed the nostalgic night with gourmet cuisine, a raffle draw with valuable prizes like cell phone, rice cooker, gift certificates and other valuable prizes were won by the guests.

Hilarious entertainment number from Lachicas and a lot more surprises kept the guests wanting for more. Giving an element of surprise to the party was Business Week announcement of the Darling of the Crowd who went to Yoyong Esmedalla of DOT X, Female Face of the Night to Ms. Chiery Ladera-Ms Kagay-an 2009 Runner-up and Male Face of the Night-Host Edzen Espina.

BWM’s Dante Sudaria received from the Miss Kagay-an organizers a Certificate of Recognition in gratitude for its untiring support for the event duly signed Mr. Anthony Brellita, chair of the Search Committee, Mr. Ruben Vegafria, president of Promote CDO and Ms. Eileen San Juan, chairperson, Kagay-an Festival 2011.



COC-PHINMA dreams big for NorMin
Read 425 times | Posted on October 31, 2011 @ 7 years ago

By JOE PALABAO
Correspondent

CAGAYAN de Oro College- PHINMA is upping its level of ensuring that the student’s success is within reach, as it begins catering to students from Barangays Cugman to Bugo, from municipalities of Tagoloan, to Salay and certain areas in Bukidnon through its new campus in Barangay Puerto.

“The first step to making life better through education is to make education accessible,” Dr. Salazar said. After achieving our goal of providing quality affordable education in Carmen, and surrounding communities, it’s time to extend this to more students, particularly in Barangay Puerto, its neighboring barangays, Misamis Oriental and Bukidnon. By bringing the school to them, we lower their transportation costs and remove the need for boarding houses. So not only are our tuition fees more affordable, the overall costs of sending kids to college are lower.

Currently in its first phase of construction, the satellite campus can already house up to 1,500 students on its first year and grow to a capacity of 4,000 students when the entire campus is complete.

The COCO-Puerto Campus will have complete facilities such as laboratories for Science, HRM and Criminology, computer rooms, a library and other multi-purpose centers. Courses offered are under the College of Management & Accountancy, Criminology, and Education, Graduate School and Basic Education will also be offered.

“Our goal is to make the dreams of our students and their families come true,” Dr. Salazar shared. “With COC-PHINMA in Puerto, success is now physically within reach.”

Cagayan de Oro College was re-established in 2005 by the PHINMA Education Network (PEN), a member of the PHINMA Group of Companies. It is now known as COC-PHINMA. PEN’s mission is to break down the financial barriers to accessing high quality education and to develop globally competitive professionals.

To ensure that its vision and mission are fulfilled, the college of engineering, nursing, criminology, arts and sciences, management & accountancy, and education, as well as graduate studies, offer academic programs which respond to the ever-changing demands of the global community.



AMLA bill OK’d on second reading
Read 664 times | Posted on October 31, 2011 @ 7 years ago

THE HOUSE of Representatives recently approved on second reading a “watered-down version” of a bill intended to strengthen Republic Act 9160 or Anti-Money Laundering Act (AMLA), with the authors claiming the amendments introduced during the floor deliberations effectively defeated the purpose of the measure.

A provision in House Bill (HB) 4275 that would have allowed the Anti-Money Laundering Council (AMLC) to inquire into or examine bank accounts of suspected money launderers without informing the account holders, provided there was probable cause, was removed.

The amendment did not sit well with author and Cagayan de Oro City Rep. Rufus B. Rodriguez (2nd district), who said the bill has been rendered “ineffective.”
“The bill has been watered down. Without that phrase, the court would have to notify the owner of the bank account, who can now withdraw the money believed to have been acquired from illegal means,” he said in a phone interview.

He explained that the present practice of informing suspects of money laundering that their accounts would be investigated “has constantly hindered the authorities from making arrests.”

During the floor deliberations, House Minority Leader Edcel C. Lagman (1st district, Albay) proposed the phrase “after due notice and hearing,” which would require the AMLC to secure an order from the Court of Appeals before it could look into suspected accounts.

Depositor would also be informed the AMLC would examine their bank accounts.
Parañaque City Rep. Roilo S. Golez, another author, said the bill is now “less strong” after the amendments, but hoped the Senate banks, financial institutions and currencies committee, which is discussing the same measure, “will move to give the bill more teeth.”

“We let [the amendment] pass in order not to delay the proceedings…. We will continue to fight in the [bicameral conference committee],” he added in a text message.

Senator Sergio R. Osmeña III, chairman of the Senate banks, financial institutions and currencies committee, refused to comment until he has read the House bill.
Lawmakers at the House also lowered the maximum penalty for offenses to P100,000 from the P500,000 the House banks and financial intermediaries committee had proposed.

They also deleted a provision in HB 4275 that would have allowed the AMLC to issue a freeze order effective for a period of 20 days, five days longer than the current 15 days, without informing an account holder, Leyte Rep. Sergio F. Apostol (2nd district), chairman of the House banks and financial intermediaries committee, said in a chance interview on Wednesday night.

“There was a move to delete it. We agreed because the AMLC can apply for a freeze order from the [Court of Appeals],” he said.

After stripping the bill of its “essential features,” Mr. Rodriguez said what remained as the most significant amendment to AMLA is the expansion of the list of institutions required to report suspicious transactions. Added to the list were casinos, real estate agents and jewelry dealers.

Kidnapping for ransom, drug dealing, illegal gambling, graft, plunder, piracy from high seas and robbery and extortion were added as predicate crimes.

AMLA, approved in 2001, defined money laundering as a criminal offense and formed the AMLC, which is the central monitoring and implementing council.

Money laundering refers to is a crime whereby proceeds of an unlawful activity are transacted to make them appear to have originated from legitimate sources, according to the AMLC website.

The AMLC could not be reached for comment regarding the changes to HB 4275.



Abolition of government corporations gets support
Read 379 times | Posted on October 31, 2011 @ 7 years ago

A MEASURE seeking to abolish underperforming Government-Owned and Controlled Corporations (GOCCs) and Government Financial Institutions (GFIs is getting support not only from members of the House of Representatives, but also local leaders who see the need for austerity programs in government.

Cagayan de Oro Rep. Rufus Rodriguez, author of the bill, also sought the closing down of Manila Gas Corp., Northern Foods Corp., Philippine Institute for Development Studies, Philippine Convention and Visitors Corp., and Philippine Center for Economic Development.

Co-author and Abante Mindanao party-list Rep. Maximo Rodriguez proposed to provide two and a half month salary as separation pay to all officers and employees of underperforming GOCCS and GFIs that would be abolished.

Camarines Sur Gov. Luis “L-Ray” Villafuerte Jr. expressed his support to House Bill 2867, which promotes spending only for things that are vital to the country by removing excess expenses from 36 GOCCs and GFIs, that are “unnecessary, underperforming and losing.”

In a letter dated October 18, Villafuerte informed President Benigno Aquino III that the approval of the legislative proposal would save a total of P7.28 billion in government subsidies to 120 state-run firms over the period from January to May this year alone.

“We are one with the sentiments of the bill authors that the continued operations of these state-run firms have put a strain on the government’s budget deficit,” Villafuerte said in his letter.

The young Villafuerte urged the Chief Executive to abolish the Partido Development Administration (PDA) claiming that the GOCC has been operating at loss of P66.24 million in 2008 and P33.35 million in 2009.

He claimed that PDA’s foreign loans and national debts amounts to more than P1 billion, which is allegedly being paid and assumed by the national government. “We believe that the PDA has done little to alleviate poverty in Partido Area and that its debts, expenses, etc are not commensurate with what our people deserve,” he claimed.

Villafuerte said the PDA was created in 1994 by Republic Act 7820 as a corporate entity tasked to oversee the development of 10 municipalities in the fourth district of Camarines Sur that became operational in October 1997.

The PDA is included in the 36 “unnecessary, underperforming and losing” GOCCs and GFIs, which House Bill 2867 wants to abolish.



Sports Tourism
Read 358 times | Posted on October 31, 2011 @ 7 years ago

By PED QUIAMJOT

In the late 80’s we follow the Tour ng Pilipinas through the hot shot cities of the Philippines. Every year during the summer period corporate sponsors bank rolled by a famous cigarette brand brings out the best of the Filipino professional cyclist to the road. From the cool winds in Tagaytay, riders compete in the road for honors and prizes up to the blistering summer heat in Tarlac to Pangasinan. Up to the penultimate route that goes up to Baguio City from La Union Province, the likes of Cornelio Padilla, speedster Rodrigo Abaguita, Reynante and many others who earned the tag as “Eagles of the Mountain” were discovered and written in the sports page of the leading national newspapers in the country as the best riders at that time.

There is euphoria and human interest that goes with any sports competition. The athletic talents, adulations and competitiveness of a team or an individual create a throng of followers. It brings the whole town cheering for their homegrown athletes. Team owners and support staff travels and sometimes the whole nation travel their fingers scanning the sports pages.

A ragtag football team assembled in less than two years period of active competition captured the imagination of the whole country that there is hope that we Filipinos can excel in a fast running game dominated by the Europeans. The dreams of a world cup stint fantasies the youth and it raises air in our adrenalin.

In boxing, we have proven ourselves as world class champions to reckon with. The names of Elorde, Penalosa, Pacquiao and Donaire are household names that even toddlers can recognize them. In basketball, we may no longer win a major championship against the hefty Koreans and the behemoths Chinese with their Mongolian prowess but it remains the most popular sports in our country. Players in the professional league are the most traveled to the major cities and the most followed. Who among Filipinos do not know James Yap? Even the bandits in Al Barka, Basilan can recognize and knows Asi Taulava, the color of his hair dye is even copied.
Sports events create tourism interests. Major athletic competitions draws patronage and sports heroes and celebrities are natural attractions for people to go out and spend whenever they are featured competitors.

A single PBA team spends an average of P350, 000 per travel, airline tickets, meals and hotel accommodation for a provincial game. Multiply it with two teams, officials and national sports journalist; it would cost a modest P800, 000 to stage an out of town professional basketball games.

And how much will it cost to bring the American Soccer Team headed by David Becham for an exhibition match against our Azkalls Team this December in Manila? The amount of travel, interest and patronage? Only MVP will know as he is the principal sponsor, donor and benefactor.

Sports tourism could be the biggest drawer. When the summer Olympics reels off in London next year, the economic impact is insurmountable. Major credit card billings will total to billions of dollars from London. The whole country will be filled up with tourist that even their Piccadilly Park will be on standing room only.



Franchise relationship, Part I
Read 512 times | Posted on October 31, 2011 @ 7 years ago

By Rudolf A. Kotik

Franchisors typically prohibit their franchises from having investments in or performing services for a competitive business. This prohibition is intended to protect confidential information, maintain the Franchisor’s revenue, prevent the use by competitors of the Franchisor’s know-how and focus the Franchisee’s efforts on his franchised business.

Such prohibitions are sometimes limited to the Franchisee’s territory or a larger territory, but frequently have no geographic limitation. Prohibited competitive business may be defined broadly, including related types of business. Such prohibitions are a deterrent to the Franchisee and a risk to termination of his franchise if he does not comply. We call that the COVENANCE clause in the Franchise Agreement.

Franchisors restrict transfers of their Franchisees in order to maintain control over the persons who operate them. Such restrictions should apply to the franchise agreement, ownership of Franchisee and the assets of the Franchisee’s business.

Typically the Franchisor reserves the right to approve the transferee and the terms of transfer. The right to approve the terms of transfer is important to insure that the buyer of the Franchisee’s business does not substantially overpay for it, or accept burdensome payment terms, which could jeopardize his ability to operate the business in compliance with the terms of the franchise.

Some franchise agreements merely provide that the Franchisor will not unreasonably withhold approval of a transfer.

Others specify in considerable details the criteria for approval relating to the proposed transferee and the terms of the transfer.

It is common for Franchisors to reserve a right of first refusal to buy the Franchisee’s business on the same terms as are offered by a bona fide purchaser.
Franchisors exercise this right to acquire franchised businesses as company-owned outlets and, occasionally, in lieu of denying approval of a proposed transfer when the Franchisor is unsure that it has sufficient grounds to disapprove a prospective transferee.

Rudolf A. Kotik is the Founder of RK Franchise Consultancy who developed more than 400 Franchises in the Philippines and can be reached through [email protected]



Talking to the Dead
Read 339 times | Posted on October 31, 2011 @ 7 years ago


BY JHAN TIAFAU HURST

THINK a minute…

A cemetery in Indiana, America has a gravestone with these words on it: “Stop stranger, when you pass me by. As you are now, so once was I. As I am now, so you will be. So prepare to die, and follow me!” A person walking by added these words underneath: “To follow you I’m not content, until I know which way you went!”

Do you sometimes wonder where your family and friends who’ve died are now? Do they want you to come where they are? Don’t you wish they could talk to you? Where are all those people now who suddenly died in the World Trade Center in New York City on September 11, 2001?

Jesus Christ made it very clear that we already know where we’re going after we die, since it’s only now that we can choose where we’ll live after we die. He warns us that it will be too late after we die to choose or change our mind.

Jesus said there are only two choices: to completely believe Him and live His way everyday, or, to keep living our own way. Heaven or hell. Jesus said there’s no in-between place for nice, good people who won’t ask for His gift of forgiveness and live for Him every day. None of us is perfect. We’ve all done some things wrong that we need Jesus to forgive us for and start changing in our character and way of living.

So we don’t need to talk to the dead to find out about life after death. Jesus Christ has already told us the truth and everything we need to know to go where we want to live after we die—together with Him and His true family in heaven.

So for your own peace of mind and safety, won’t you ask Jesus to forgive you for living your own way before it’s too late? Then ask Him to take full charge of your heart and help you start living His way every day, for the rest of your life.
Just think a minute…



Hedcor brightens the future of 5 OSYs
Read 372 times | Posted on October 31, 2011 @ 7 years ago

Hedcor Sibulan, Inc. awarded the five Indigenous People scholars a certificate of completion for a 3-month welding course last October 15 during the turnover of annual royalty shares to IP community at the newly inaugurated Tribal Purok at Barangay Sibulan, Davao del Sur.

“Dili masukod ang akong kalipay nga sa karon nakita na nako ang akoang kaugmaon. Makakita nako’g nindot nga trabaho puhon ug posibling masuklian na nako karon akong ginikanan sa pagpadako nila sa akoa. Kini tungod sa Hedcor sa paghatag nila sa ako og higayon nga makaskwela og welding nga libre ang tanan. (My happiness is immeasurable seeing my future endeavor.

Soon, I can have a good job and possibly, I can repay my parents from bearing me up. This is because of Hedcor for giving me a chance to study a welding course, all for free.),” said John Dave Gulani. The welding course administered by Technical Education Skills Development Authority (TESDA) was completed by Nestor Concepcion, Arnold Puroc, Jisson Aninipot, Delfin Lanzo, and Gulani who are residents of Hedcor’s host tribal community. They were once out-of-school youths (OSYs) who benefited the program.

“Dako na ayu ang natabang sa Hedcor kanako, sa among pamilya ug labaw sa tanan sa among kumunidad. Lahi ra gyud among kahimtang sa una kesa karon nga ni abot ang Hedcor diri. (Hedcor aided a lot to me, to my family, and most of all to our community. When Hedcor came here, there is a big difference in our living status now compared before),” Gulani added.

Puroc and Lanzo will render their 200 hours on-job-training (OJT) at Sibulan plant starting November 14 while Concepcion, Aninipot and Gulani were endorsed by TESDA to have their OJT in General Santos City.

Hedcor vice president Engr. Gregorio Jabonillo said, “Aside from providing clean and renewable energy, we from Hedcor are here because we are committed to help the community’s economic growth including the free education to our host indigenous people”.

Hedcor regularly undertakes Corporate Social Responsibility projects focusing on education, health, reforestation, energization, and livelihood.

AboitizPower’s subsidiary Hedcor is the Philippines largest developer and producer of run-of-rivers hydropower facilities operating in Benguet, Ilocos Sur, and Davao with a total capacity of 150 MW.



PNB plans to issue long-term deposit certificates
Read 419 times | Posted on October 31, 2011 @ 7 years ago

LUCIO TAN-controlled Philippine National Bank (PNB) will issue long-term negotiable certificates of deposit (LTNCD) to raise P5 billion to help finance operations.

In a disclosure to the stock exchange on Friday, PNB said it had obtained the central bank’s approval “to issue long-term negotiable certificates of up to P5 billion.”

The issuance of the investment instruments — similar to time deposits but can be traded in the secondary market — is scheduled “in the coming weeks, subject to favorable market conditions and compliance with regulatory requirements.”

PNB said it will use the amount raised for “general corporate purposes and further strengthen its banking operations.”

Horacio E. Cebrero III, PNB executive vice-president and Treasury head, said the bank is planning on issuing either five- or five-and-a-half-year LTNCDs.

The issuance will be done in tranches, with the first expected to raise at least P3 billion.

Deutsche Bank AG (Manila), Multinational Investment Bancorporation, Allied Banking Corp. (Allied Bank) and PNB Capital & Investment Corp. have been chosen as arrangers.

PNB raised P6.5 billion from the sale of lower Tier 2 notes in June to refinance maturing Tier 2 notes. It has gotten the central bank’s approval to raise up to P10 billion from the debt notes.

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