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Archive for January, 2012





First relief convoy arrives in Iligan’s remotest barangays
Read 608 times | Posted on January 31, 2012 @ 7 years ago

Tubod, Lanao del Norte – More than a month after deadly Tropical Storm Sendong hit Iligan City, huge quantity of relief goods finally arrived in the remotest barangays of Iligan.

In the multi-sectoral relief operation led by the provincial LGU of Lanao del Norte, twelve army trucks arrived in the interior barangay of Rogongon to deliver essential goods, food items, school supplies and rice packs to victims of the deadliest storm to hit the country for 2011.

This was the first relief operation which used a land convoy to deliver the relief assistance. In previous humanitarian operations, relief goods had to be flown in via helicopter after parts of the Iligan-Bukidnon road became impassable due to massive landslides triggered by heavy rains.

“This is our humble way of showing the Iliganons that Lanao del Norte cares and that we are one with them in this horrific tragedy. Governor Khalid Dimaporo has also sent our doctors to conduct free clinic in this very remote area”, Information Officer Lyndon Calica said.

More than a hundred children also eagerly participated in the kiddie party organized by Dunkin’ Donuts-Iligan at Calamalamahan Elementary School, Rogongon. The pupils received donuts, masks, tumblers, and umbrellas from the local branch of Dunkin’ Donuts.

“We are happy to partner with the provincial government on this laudable event, especially since we are doing this for the Sendong victims”, Dunkin’ Donuts Manager Nancy Redila expressed.

Aside from the distribution of rice packs containing 3 kilos of commercial rice each, the Lanao del Norte LGU also gave free medicines to residents who availed of the free clinic at the barangay multi-purpose hall.

Among the civic organizations and NGOs who participated in the massive relief operation were Kiwanis Club (Industrial City), MSU-IIT MPC Cooperative Social Responsibility Committee, PAILIG Development Foundation, and the Rotary Club of Uptown Iligan.

“We really need everyone’s help to rebuild and rehabilitate Iligan. That is why, we are again partnering with Lanao del Norte in delivering the much-needed relief assistance to the victims of Sendong”, said Rotarian Past President Mary Ann Superable-Nacion.

During the short program held at the barangay hall, 2nd District Representative Fatima Aliah Dimaporo encouraged the local residents of Rogongon and Digkilaan that, “life can still be beautiful after Sendong. We just have to work together and help each other through this dark period”.

To reach the distribution site, Dimaporo and the rest of the convoy had to travel for two-hours over treacherous winding roads before reaching Iligan’s remotest barangay.

Provincial employees from the Information Office, Community Affairs Office, Health Office, Disaster and Risk Reduction Management Office, and Social Welfare and Development Office were also at hand to facilitate in the humanitarian campaign.

In the event, PAILIG Development Foundation also officially launched its 5Rs for Iligan: Relief, Recovery, Renewal, Rehabilitation and Reconstruction led by its Managing Director Bobby Quijano.

“We are happy that Congresswoman Aliah Dimaporo personally visited our place to inspire the people. And we are also thankful to Lanao del Norte and all the organizations who made this relief operation possible” Brgy. Councilor Arnel Ruelan expressed. VNL/PIO-LDN

Photo caption: Pupils from the Calamalamahan Elementary School were amazed by the dancing mascot during the kiddie party sponsored by Dunkin’ Donuts-Iligan as part of the massive relief operation organized by the Lanao del Norte LGU. For many children, it was their first time to see a mascot perform.



EDUCATIONAL FUN AT D’BONE COLLECTOR MUSEUM
Read 465 times | Posted on January 31, 2012 @ 7 years ago

by Henrylito D. Tacio

Finally, it’s official. The D’Bone Collector Museum, Inc. finally had its grand opening recently. “I am very happy that this museum will help people to be educated on how we can preserve and conserve our remaining natural resources, particularly the animal species,” said Darrell D. Blatchley, the museum’s curator and director.

Inside the museum are collections of different bones, skulls, and skeletons of animals, marine species, birds and butterflies. Among the attractions are the huge sperm whale, the jaws of sharks, the Cambodian python (one of the longest snakes in the world), and armadillo.

Blatchley himself collected them since he was a still boy; some of the collections were donated by private individuals and institutions who believe that through the museum, conservation and protection awareness can be shared.

People who were invited to grace the opening were glad they came. They never thought that such a museum would exist in Davao City. “This could be one of the city’s prime destinations.” As if echoing the words of the Department of Tourism, one visitor said, “Indeed, it’s more fun to visit Davao City.”

Former councilor Leonardo Avilla III, now the chief of the City Agriculture Office, delivered a short congratulatory message. In her short message, Fatma Idris, of the research division of the Bureau of Fisheries of Aquatic Resources, thanked Blatchley for coming up such museum that would raise awareness in the conservation of not just the marine species but also those found in land and air.

Orly Escarilla, director of the Museo Dabawenyo, read the message of Mayor Sara Duterte-Carpio, who failed to attend the opening. In an interview, Escarilla said that both museums will work together to further enhance the tourism activities of the city.

I didn’t only attend the grand opening of the museum; I was also asked to deliver a short message. This is what I told the audience:

“At the rate our ecosystems are getting destroyed, many species may no longer be there when we need them.” These words were penned by Samuel Penafiel, former director of the Protected Areas and Wildlife Bureau.

Today, most of our endemic resources are vanishing: the Philippine Eagle, tamaraw, calamian deer, tarsier, Panay flying fox, flying lemur, Cebu black shama, Philippine crocodile, pawikan, and waling-waling.

Next to Australia, the Philippines has the most number of seagrasses. Of the almost 700 coral reefs known in the world, 500 of these can be found in our country. We have the second largest eagle in the world. We have in our waters the world’s smallest fish.

The Philippines is touted as one of the hotspots in the world – due to our endemic species and how these species are threatened.

Once these species are gone from this part of the world, they will be gone forever. They will join the dodo into extinction. Has anyone seen a picture of dodo? First sighted around 1600 on Mauritius, an island in the Indian Ocean, the dodo was extinct less than eighty years later.

How many of our flora and fauna will join the dodo at the end of this century? No one knows. In the near future, we may not see them anymore but only through the pages of books, in pictures, or in museum.

Whenever I visit another country, I am always fascinated by their exquisite plants and enthralling animals.

I did have a grand time in Australia when I visited the zoo at Melbourne. I did have a safari in Durban when I went to South Africa. I enjoyed watching sea creatures at the Mall of America in Minnesota.

But the museum that really fascinated me was the Smithsonian Museum in Washington, D.C. It was sort of “see all you can.” I never had the chance of seeing all the museums but manage to see only four of them.

One of those that attracted me was the Museum of Natural History. Once you get inside you see a huge elephant. As you tour around the building, you will see different animals and interesting creatures, among others.

Why I am telling all these? The reason is: D’Bone Collectors Museum is sort of part of the Smithsonian Museum. It has almost everything what you need to see in a museum: the bones and skeletons, some interesting facts and tidbits, the lights and designs.

I have been to other museums in the country but I believe this museum in Davao is one of the best. This will join the long list of areas to be visited in Davao.

We have several places of interest when it comes to ecotourism. We have the Philippine Eagle Center, the Crocodile Park, the Malagos Garden Resort, the Eden Nature Park, and several others. I have been to most of these areas and I commend for what they are doing: preservation, beautification, and education.

Most of those featured live flora and fauna. And it is good that Filipinos can still see them alive today – although in cages and in contained areas.

What if they will be gone just like the dodo? D’Bone Collector Museum is the place to visit. The visitors will get an opportunity of seeing the bones of the animals – how they look like. As a bonus, the collections are not only from the Philippines but in other parts of the world.

I want to congratulate Darrel Blatchley and his family for coming up with a museum like this. And kudos too for building it in Davao City, one of the world’s largest cities.

End of my speech.

The D’Bone Collectors Museum is located sort of an extension of San Pedro Street. Actually, it is in Bucana. Once you get to the place, there is a big parking area where you can live your vehicle.

It is open from Mondays to Fridays only – from 8 in the morning to 5 in the afternoon. Entrance fee is P50 for adults and P40 for students and children.



MARKETING GOES MALLING as SM Marketmall OPENS IN DASMARINAS
Read 531 times | Posted on January 31, 2012 @ 7 years ago

Residents of the City of Dasmariñas gave a new shopping concept a warm welcome when the SM Marketmall recently opened its doors to the public.

As soon as, in the SM tradition, SM executives led by SM Food Retail President Herbert Sy opened its doors to welcome the first wave of shoppers, eager and excited crowds quickly packed this mall of firsts.

The first public-private partnership between a City Government and SM Prime Holdings, the 5-storey, more than 10,000 square meter Marketmall is envisioned to be a destination for foodies in search for fresh products and homegrown cuisine.

Housed in a modern, multi-storey building, it is well lighted and well ventilated. Open 24 hours, It is the first vertical wet market development with a Hypermarekt, 1,073 wet and dry market stalls, restaurants, services, and a bagsakan area.

Shopping in the Marketmall is easy because the stainless steel stalls in the wet in dry areas and properly zoned and color-coded. And then, there is the convenience of the multi-level parking area with provisions for 252 vehicles, as well as accessible transportation for commuters.

During opening day, customers had a glimpse of Cavite’s homegrown food offerings at the Tiendas de Dasmarinas where foods like the famous Imus Kutsinta, Tinapang Salinas, Seaweed Crackers, Gatas ng General Trias, Cafe Amadeo, Paella Negra, Marinara, and other Cavite products were showcased.

Earlier in the day, no less than Cavite Vice Governor Recto Cantimbuhan, Dasmarinas City Congressman Pidi Barzaga and Dasmarinas Mayor Jenny Barzaga shared honors in the ribbon cutting ceremonies with Mrs. Felicidad Sy and SM Food Retail President Herbert Sy. SM Prime Holdings’ Hans Christian Sy, Jr., SM Hypermarket Robert Kwee, SM Supermalls President Annie Garcia, and Reverend Father Leoben Peregrino also joined them.

Located along Dasmarinas Bagong Bayan Congressional Road, Dasmariñas, City, Cavite, the SM Marketmall serves customers from Dasmariñas City and nearby towns such as Imus, GMA, Carmona, General Trias and even some part of Trece Martirez City.

Apart from the SM Hypermarket and the wet and dry market, it also has food tenants like Jollibee, Mang Inasal, and Chowking; as well as services like BDO, Test Point, Mr. Quickie, Dermcare, LBC, Inkrite, APD Travel, M. H Burton, A-1 Driving and Lucky Circle.

The SM Marketmall is not only clean, well maintained, and secure, but also has PWD friendly facilities, and sho

The SM Marketmall is not only clean, well maintained, and secure, but also has PWD friendly facilities, and showcases environmentally sustainable practices with a sewage treatment plant that recycles water, but also proper garbage segregation and disposal.

The SM Marketmall’s design and construction team includes Jose Siao Ling and Associates, Architects and Designers; and R. M. Cabanela Construction and Management Corp, General Contractor.



A PAIN IN YOUR CHEST
Read 849 times | Posted on January 31, 2012 @ 7 years ago

By Henrylito D. Tacio

Suddenly, you’re having chest pains, and a wave of fear overtakes you. You’ve seen enough episodes of those television series to know that that means.

Before you go into a panic, consider one thing first: While TV chest pains are always heart attacks, the causes of real life chest pains are not always so dramatic.

“Though we must always consider the worst, there are over 50 possible causes of chest pain, many of which have nothing to do with the heart and are not at all life threatening,” assures Dr. Charles E. Chambers, assistant professor of medicine at Pennsylvania State University. “In general, a sudden jab of pain, a dull, lingering ache, a burning feeling or a sensation that changes when you shift your upper body usually rule out a heart disease problem or one that needs immediate emergency treatment.”

If it’s not a heart attack, then what must be the cause of the chest pain? If the chest pain subsides in 5 to 15 minutes, then it’s what cardiologist call angina pectoris or just plain angina. With angina, fatty deposits accumulate inside the coronary arteries, narrowing the channels, slowing the blood flow to the heart muscle and depriving it of much needed-oxygen.

“Angina typically occurs during exertion or moments of excitement when the heart works harder and requires more oxygen-rich blood,” explains Dr. Marvin Moser, author of Week by Week to a Strong Heart. “It’s the heart way of signaling that it needs more oxygen, just as you calf muscle does when you develop a cramp.”

Angina is different from a heart attack in that the arteries are not completely blocked, and it causes little or no permanent damage to the heart. As such, angina is not a medical emergency.

However, angina may be a warning of a heart attack to come. Suppose one of the arteries is severely narrowed or a blood clot completely cuts off blood supply to a portion of the heart. A portion of the heart muscle can actually die. When that happens, it is a heart attack!

“Usually, the most recognizable symptom of a heart attack is pain in the middle of the chest that may spread to the back, jaw, or left arm,” notes The Merck Manual of Medical Information. “Less often, the pain spreads to the right arm. The pain may occur in one or more of these places and not in the chest at all.”

Other symptoms of a heart attack are a feeling of faintness, sudden heavy sweating, nausea, shortness of breath, and a heavy pounding of the heart. “Abnormal heart rhythms occur in more than 90 percent of people who have had a heart attack,” the Merck manual informs.

Your risk of having a heart attack is greater if: you have a family history of heart disease; you smoke, use cocaine, or are overweight; and you have high cholesterol, high blood pressure, or diabetes.

Heart pain isn’t always coronary artery disease, however. Consider pericarditis, inflammation of the membranes around the heart. It’s usually caused by a virus. This common condition can produce a constant sharp pain that worsens with each breath when you lie down. Rips in the heart’s artery or disease of the heart’s valves can lead to a wide variety of chest pain symptoms, and all are usually different from those of angina or heart attacks.

Or the chest pain may be caused by mitral valve prolapse. This is an abnormality of one of the heart vales in which the “leaves” of the valve bulge into the upper heart chamber during contraction. When this occurs, a small amount of blood flows backward in the heart. This is believed by some to be a cause of chest pain in certain people, although this has not been proven with certainty.

There are also chest pains that don’t originate in the heart. The lungs, for instance, can be the source of the chest pain. Pneumonia, regarded by William Osler as “the captain of the men of death,” is an infection of the lung tissue. Chest pain occurs because of inflammation to the lining of the lungs.

Then there’s spontaneous pneumothorax or collapsed lung. This condition occurs when air enters the saclike space between the chest wall and the lung tissue. Normally, negative pressure in the chest cavity allows the lungs to expand. When a spontaneous pneumothorax occurs, air enters the chest cavity. When the pressure balance is lost, the lung is unable to re-expand. This cuts off the normal oxygen supply in the body.

Another chest pain that may arise from the lungs is pulmonary embolism, a blood clot in the blood vessels of the lung. This almost always occurs in someone who is at high risk for the disorder due to recent surgery, bed rest, pregnancy or recent pelvic surgery, or a long airplane flight. The pain occurs suddenly, is accompanied by shortness of breath, and may be worsened with deep breaths.

“Pulmonary embolism is a potentially life-threatening cause of chest pain but is not associated with the heart,” points out Dr. John P. Cunha, a U.S. board-certified emergency medicine physician.

Esophagus, the tube that connects the mouth and throat to the stomach, can also be a source of chest pain. In fact, chest pain from esophageal disorders can be an alarming symptom because it often mimics chest pain from a heart attack.

Disorders of the esophagus include: gastroesophageal reflux disease (this occurs when acidic digestive juices flow backward from the stomach into the esophagus. The resulting heartburn is sometimes experienced as chest pain), esophagitis (an inflammation of the esophagus), and esophageal spasm (the muscles around the esophagus contract abnormally, causing pain).

In some instances, the chest pain may be caused by costochondritis. This is an inflammation of the cartilage between the ribs. Pain is typically located in the mid-chest, with intermittently dull and sharp pain that may be increased with deep breaths, movement, and deep touch.

“Don’t try to walk off a sudden chest pain,” advises Dr. John Cantwell, director of preventive medicine and cardiac rehabilitation at Georgia Baptist Hospital in Atlanta. “If the pain is from angina, it should go away with a few minutes of rest. If it doesn’t, or if it gets worse, get to a doctor.”

It is hard to know what to do when you feel pain or discomfort in the chest. Is it a heart attack or another, less serious problem? Because chest pain can be a sign of a heart attack, it is important to seek help and get treatment as quickly as possible.



Global Outlook, Globally Recognized
Read 888 times | Posted on January 31, 2012 @ 7 years ago

Global Outlook, Globally Recognized



By Dr. Djuwari
STIE Perbanas (College of Economics and Business)
Surabaya,

It is advisable for all organizations to get globally recognized with the help of technology advancement. Now, universities or colleges are trying to get their fame. It is not only in national scale but also international scale. To do so, they are trying hard to utilize their technology advancement through website.

However, to have website only is not a guarantee to make them recognized. It is not only maximizing the website with information concerning the universities or colleges’ identities but they have to get involved in other academic activities. This can be done by collaborating with other universities or colleges to do research and publication.

When doing the research, they have to exchange ideas and share experience among the universities or colleges. By exchanging ideas, they can get acknowledged to what extent they have advanced their state-of-the art research when compared to other universities or colleges. In that way, they can keep a breast of the current development of research activities.

When sharing experience in connection with research activities, they can also learn how to do the same research with the same methodology in different situation. This can be done for example by developing the present research and then add some more sophisticated instruments. In that situation, they can learn both the weaknesses and the strengths of the previous studies.

Thus, by exchanging ideas and sharing experience, all faculty staff can keep abreast of the present knowledge prevailing outside. From this way, collaboration among the universities or colleges can also be done. All information has been exchanged among the universities or colleges, and this makes them globally recognized.

Why can they be globally recognized? It is common that among the universities have their journal publication, academic journal concerning the research results. The research results from the universities or colleges are mostly published in scientific journals. The articles published in such academic journals are both viewed and downloaded by many academicians or researchers. At least, they are viewed.

With global outlook, universities or colleges are expected to be globally recognized. The vision of any organization recently is always concerned with global outlook. This means that an organization can go international by doing some activities related to global mindedness. Conferences or seminars with proceedings and journal publications can be the examples of the effort for universities or colleges to get them globally recognized.

To what extent any organization is globally recognized can be measured by how often the organization is exposed to international public. This cannot be merely done by only benefiting from the website being designed. Other activities related to collaboration and cooperation should also be done.

Exchanging good ideas with others and sharing best experience among the universities or colleges are the examples of the efforts making them globally recognized. Thus, it is salient for universities to get involved in such academic endeavors. The most important thing of the above activities is that there won’t be gap of knowledge among the researchers through out the world. The end goal, for humanity, is making the world balanced.

Dr. Djuwari id the director of Language Laboratory, STIE Perbanas Surabaya, currently being the Vice Chair of International E-Conference held in collaboration with Texila American University.



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