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Archive for August, 2012





HARNESSING THE POWER OF MEDIA
Read 375 times | Posted on August 31, 2012 @ 6 years ago

HARNESSING THE POWER OF MEDIA

Gracia and Maribojoc Elementary Schools in Tagoloan, Misamis Oriental are the latest recipients of the Educational Television (ETV) package from energy-firm STEAG State Power Inc. (SPI) and ABS-CBN Foundation.

SPI Comrel Manager Ghaye Alegrio and Tagoloan Mayor Paulino Emano led recently the simple turn-over rites. Designed to enhance the classroom teaching and learning process, the ETV program has so far gained marked improvements in the public education performance.

Studies showed a differential performance of as much as 23% between those exposed to the ETV science series and those who were not part of the program. Grades 2 & 3 pupils exposed to the ETV science episodes absorbed twice as much of the concepts than those who were given regular, non-augmented instruction. Interestingly, understanding of the concepts in Filipino appeared to facilitate the transfer of learning to English.

In Villanueva and Tagoloan districts where the program has been running since 2005, students’ performance as measured by the National Achievement Test (NAT) results also improved. In Villanueva for instance, NAT rating increased from 55.51% to 77.19%. in 2011. The program also saw teaching methodology improvement such that teachers can deliver in 20 minutes the concepts that they usually teach in two days.

So far, nearly 60% of the 22 public schools in Tagoloan and Villanueva have been provided with the ETV package consisting of a flat screen 32” TV set, a DVD player, and more than 500 educational TV episodes sine eskwela on Science, Math, English and Civics.



POWERADE ION4 Powers The Pinoy Olympians
Read 488 times | Posted on August 31, 2012 @ 6 years ago

POWERADE ION4 Powers The Pinoy Olympians

Success is not pre-destined.
It belongs to the determined.

So power your spirit.
Fuel your passion.
Stop when you’re done,
not when you’re tired.
When you’re about to break down,
break through.
Make everything you do
A chance to outdo yourself.
Be relentless and complete your goal.

In this game called life,
You are your greatest challenger.
Once you conquer your limits
Then your victory is complete.

Power your Olympic spirit

Coveting the elusive gold medal is the ultimate prize for every Olympian. So just imagine the desire, the hope within an athlete who has never brought home one for his beloved nation. This is the fire burning within our prized Philippine delegates to the 2012 London Olympics.

As the Official Sports Drink of the London 2012 Olympic Games, new upgraded Powerade ION4, the complete sports drink, helps competitors power through the toughest moments on their journey to achieve glory. The Philippines’ finest athletes will be competing in the London 2012 Olympic Games to pursue the first Olympic Gold Medal for the Philippines. Powerade ION4 has chosen three of them as brand ambassadors as they continue to challenge themselves as world-class athletes.

Mark Barriga, all 18 years old and 48 kilograms of him, is the country’s bet for boxing’s light flyweight division. Though unheralded and unassuming, Mark’s accolades continue to grow: 3-time Palarong Pambansa gold medalist, 2-time National Open gold medalist, Sydney Jackson Memorial gold medalist plus international stints in Azerbaijan and Uzbekistan.

Hailing from San Jose, Negros Oriental, Marestella Torres is our official delegate to the London Olympics long jump competition. Being ranged against the best is nothing new for Marestella; she has seen action in the South East Asian Games, among other international competitions – where she holds the record for long jump. She also boasts of Olympic experience after her previous bid in the 2008 Beijing Olympics.

Brian Rosario started shooting at an early age of 14 as his father was also a skeet shooter. Now 30, Brian trains four times weekly, and he gets all the strength and inspiration through his family, making him mentally and physically prepared for the Olympics. He recently led the team in the South East Asian Shooting Championship and had decent finishes in the World Cup. His recent feat was just one point shy of the winning effort the 2008 Beijing Olympics gold medalist.

The final roster of 11 athletes going to the 2012 London Olympics from July 27 – August 13 are as follows: Mark Barriga – Boxing, Marestella Torres – Athletics, Brian Rosario – Shooting, Rene Herrera – Athletics, Jasmine Alkhaldi – Swimming, Jessie Lacuna – Swimming, Tomohiko Hoshina – Judo, Daniel Caluag – Cycling, Hidilyn Diaz – Weightlifting, Mark Javier – Archery, and Rachel Anne Cabral – Archery.

Following the success of the epic kick-off the Hydration Revolution led by the Complete Sports Drink, New POWERADE ION4® with Advanced Electrolyte System recently, the brand finally comes face to face with Team Philippines to the London 2012 Olympics during the send-off given by the Philippine Olympic Committee at the Marikina Sports Complex last June 25, 2012. As part of thrust for a Healthy and Active Lifestyle of The Coca-Cola Company, Powerade ION4 hydrated athletes and sports enthusiast alike during the sports clinic arranged by the POC.

“We were all very excited to be part of the Olympics and have the chance to rally behind the nation’s best sportsmen and women. It’s our pride to support Olympic Gold hopefuls Mark, Marestella and Brian, and the rest of the Team Philippines as they welcome POWERADE ION4 as their hydration partner. We couldn’t be any prouder and we know we couldn’t miss our chance to make a powerful welcome.” Says Teejae Sonza, Group Brand Manager for Hydration of The Coca-Cola Export Corporation.

In addition, Sonza says, “We are all aware that the Philippines will not have the biggest delegation in the London Olympics but each of our Pinoy Olympian has a heart of a winner. We can only be sure they’d deliver nothing short of a power-packed performance. We are confident they will power through! And all the way through until they bring home the gold hopefully, Powerade ION4 will back them up.”

In this prestigious, cut-throat test of power and performance, we are to be represented by outstanding sportsmen. This upcoming London Olympics, they are going to banner our flag and eye for nothing short of the top spot. Powerade ION4 will further fuel their Olympic spirit by asking Filipinos to show their support and be at one with us in taking their game to a whole new level.

Powerade pledges to donate P100 for every running video uploaded to the Run4Gold Facebook app. This is the first virtual marathon with a target of 10,000 “runners” to reward the 1st Filipino Olympic Gold Medalist with P1 million pesos.

Powerade also has the Olympic Mosaic project where you can leave messages for our athletes and give your support as they power through their Olympic quest for gold. As reward, we will be creating a mosaic of all the supporters and feature them on a billboard together with the three Powerade Olympic ambassadors.

To know how you can complete your support to the Philippine Olympic Team go to the Powerade ION4 Facebook Fan Page (www.facebook.com/powerade) and follow @PoweradePH on Twitter for more Olympic updates.

Ready to Power Through. Philippine Olympians take pride in representing the nation in
the London 2012 Olympics. L-R: Jessie Lacuna (swimmer), Teejae Sonza (Group Brand Manager
for Hydration), Jasmine Alkhaldi (swimming), Rene Herrera (steeple chase), Hidilyn Diaz (weightlifting),
Brian Rosario (skeet shooting).

Weightlifter Hidilyn Diaz conditions
herself for her first Olympic stint.

Jessie Lacuna broke records in Philippine
Swimming. He plans to do the same in London.

Fuel Your Olympic Spirit. Young taekwondo jins cheer on the 2012 Olympians.

Athletics hopefuls aim high to claim the 1st Olympic Gold for the Philippines.
Marestella Torres (long jump) and Rene Herrera (steeple chase) hydrate with Powerade
to complete their game plan.

Swimmer Jessie Lacuna and
Long Jumper Marestella Torres
sharing their thoughts on the
Olympics with press people.

IOC Rep Frank Elizalde, POC President Jose “Peping” Cojuangco, and
Marikina Mayor Del De Guzman encourages the youth to get into sports.



MRDP helps former ‘reds’ build green community
Read 630 times | Posted on August 31, 2012 @ 6 years ago

MRDP helps former ‘reds’ build green community

by Sherwin B. Manual

Salay, Misamis Oriental — This town known in the past as the stronghold of insurgent groups has offered rebel returnees greener pasture with cattle and vegetables.

“We plant organic vegetables, we care for our cattle and we earn a decent living,” said Ruwena S. Daling bookkeeper of United Urban Poor Vegetable Farmers Association Incorporated.

But Daling, 50, a mother of four said it was a different story years ago.

“We had nothing. Most of our members were rebel returnees. We have no land to till; we had no viable source of income,” she said.

Their organization of 18 members was organized way back in 2008 through a government project but never really prospered.

“We have already started our gardening projects way back then but it was very small we cannot even sell them. We also long to have cattle because it will expectedly give us bigger income,” Daling said.

Luckily, in early 2009 their barangay captain and now vice mayor Angelo Capistrano, Jr. lobbied for their endorsement in the Department of Agriculture’s Mindanao Rural Development Program (DA-MRDP) for which they were awarded P250,000.00 for their proposed organic vegetable production and cattle dispersal projects.

Moreover, the government-owned lot measuring about 1.25 hectares in barangay Poblacion, Hanil Purok 7 was also lent to them to be cultivated.

MRDP is DA’s unique antipoverty program for Mindanao funded by World Bank and the counterpart of the national and local government units (LGUs).

Under the program’s Community Fund for Agricultural Development (CFAD), the livelihood component, the PO beneficiary with the assistance of the LGU, manages their own project and funds from the project identification, procurement and all other aspects of project implementation including its sustainability measures.

“It all came together, the program made us capable. We really felt the government’s assistance and support to our needs both at the local and national level for which we are very thankful,” Daling said.

“We used the money to buy nine heads of cattle, vegetable seeds, organic fertilizer, and other farm inputs amounting to a total of P223,000.00 while the rest of the money was deposited in the bank as part of our mobilization and administrative funds,” she added.

The cattle were distributed through drawing of lots. Once the cattle produces offspring, the mother cow will be given to the next-in-line beneficiary.

“As of now, at least five cows have borne offspring,” Daling said.

While waiting for the income from the cattle dispersal, Daling said their organic vegetable gardens have helped them raise incomes, support their family’s basic needs and keep a healthy body.

“We plant organic vegetables from pinakbet-type, chopsuey-type to the indigenous vegetables which we either just consume or sell in the neighborhood and to local traders,” Daling said.

Their garden teems with amplaya, bottle gourd, eggplant, squash, tomatoes, cauliflower and broccoli and some green leafy vegetables, way far from their olden garden crops of kangkong, alugbati, and other indigenous crops.

Each member rents each plot at P10.00 per month planted to crops of their preference. However, regulation and crop rotation is also observed in order not to over supply one type of vegetable and prevent jealousy among members.

A minimum of two plots will be assigned to a member. Others acquire eight or more depending on how much one can cultivate.

The members earn in two-ways: one is by selling their harvest to local traders twice a week and by vending their crop around the town by themselves.

“Local vegetable traders come to our farms and buy our harvest twice a week. Sometimes, other members opt to harvest their crops, and buy from our other members and sell the vegetables around town which adds to our regular weekly income,” Daling said.

They allow such set-up especially to those members who have immediate financial needs to cover mostly school payments, but they also remind each member to maintain the volume of their harvest to keep their supply to the local market.

“We have at least 23 regular costumers who buys in volume whom we give a gate price of cauliflower at P40 a kilo; petchay P20 per kilo, squash P15, eggplant P20.00 and other leafy vegetables range from P12-P15 a kilo,” Daling said, adding:

“We earn at least P200.00 a day from vending around town, aside from our weekly income from the regular costumers plus we have already secured our own daily supply of vegetables. This is much better than our lives before,” she said.

Since the group is using organic fertilizer, they have also availed themselves of the vermiculture project from the provincial government for the production of vermicast and vermin tea.

“The local DA office which constantly monitors our project here has also aided us in the proper animal management of our cattle dispersal and even supply the necessary biologics,”Daling said.

In 2011, their organization bagged first prize of the local G4 (Go, Grow, Glow Garden) competition of the National Anti-Poverty Commission and received the cash prize of P50,000.00

“Our dream is to buy our own garden lot and have a stall in the public market where we can directly sell our harvest,” Daling enthused.

Coming back to the bosom of the government, they have become the “ green armies” in their community.



Green groups conduct tree growing, envi-concert for oro fiesta
Read 351 times | Posted on August 31, 2012 @ 6 years ago

Green groups conduct tree growing, envi-concert for oro fiesta

Cagayan de Oro- While fiesta of St. Agustine is getting close, churches, environmental groups, people’s organization and musicians are holding series of alternative activities in line with the city’s festivity. Earlier today, at 7:00 o’ clock in the morning, around five hundred parishioners coming from city churches of Iglesia Filipina Independiente(IFI) will gather near the rivers of Hinaplanon, a low lying sittio located between the boundaries of Barangays Iponan and Baikingon part of the city for a program dubbed as “liturgical celebration and tree growing for ecological justice”.

The group will be targeting an initial of one thousand seedlings of assorted fruit and shade trees to be planted alongside the riverbanks of Iponan. Noontime of the same day, they will be joined by representatives of ecumenical and interfaith group like the United Church of Christ in the Philippines, United Methodist Church, Roman Catholic nuns, indigenous people, farmers, urban poor etc. through a gathering of advocates in time of the blessing of an advocacy center in Bulua IFI church .

“We timed this activity a day before the historical date of “cry of pugadlawin” to highlight the present cry of the Filipino people especially the sendong victims against the onslaught of creation” said Bishop Felixberto Calang of the IFI Diocese of Misamis Oriental, Bukidnon and Camiguin. “We would like to emphasize the difference of tree growing from merely tree planting. The community and stakeholders must work hand in hand in this effort and link it to policy advocacy opposing large scale mining and corporate plantations as we push for alternative laws like the ‘people’s mining bill’ etc. as proposed by progressive representatives in the congress” pointed out by the spiritual leader.

According to Gamalleil Ranan of Survivors of Sendong (SOS), a citizen led grass-root organization reported that “San Simon and Canitoan dredging barges have been gone but has transfered only to another place particularly in Batinay”. The said structure have been forced to disappear after being lambasted with protests from broad sectors of Cagay-anon.
For her part, Task Force Save Iponan River spokesperson Rev. Emma Catubig, women minister of Iponan church, said that “permits of this foreign owned mining equipment must be terminated by authorities once and for all to finally put a stop to their destructive operations causing discoloration, siltation and chemical contamination of the river”.

Later in the afternoon, a group of musicians will launch their ‘sendong’ inspired environmental music album via a free concert at the Bulua IFI Church. The local artist named “dumbol doy!” will sing all original songs including their carrier “buti pa ang climate may change” and “raptyur” depicting the irony of repeated environmental hazards and tragedy but still government laws and program have not changed, worse, perpetuate even more especially on mining and plantation expansions. Dance, play and choral performances will also be seen during the cultural festival. Few hundred more youth from schools and community will also join the educational jam for mother earth.



Sun Cellular leads Prepaid Market with best Year-on-Year Performance
Read 277 times | Posted on August 31, 2012 @ 6 years ago

Sun Cellular leads the market having posted the industry’s highest growth in the mobile prepaid segment for the first half of the year with a 15% increase versus the same period last year. Sun Cellular officials attribute the growth to its expanding network reach, best-value products, and added features to its unlimited load variants and SIM cards.

Sun earlier reported a 17% increase in over-all net service revenues for the first half of 2012.

“We are thrilled that our customers continue to patronize our best value prepaid line of products and services. We continue to enhance our product offerings such as adding 100 texts to all networks to our very popular Php25 1-day Call and Text Unlimited.” said Joel Lumanlan, Sun Cellular’s Vice President for Prepaid Business. “Responsive to the needs of our customers, we came up with new load variants such as the TextALL Plus 25 which gives our subscribers not only texts to all networks but also 60 minutes of Sun calls and 30 minutes of mobile internet. Products such as these have proven to be quite popular with old and new customers alike.” He added.

Lumanlan further shared, “We have also observed that aside from the increasing demand for our best value daily unlimited and bucket products, more and more subscribers are using our prepaid loads with longer validity as they offer not only greater value for money but also convenience and security. Topping up with load good for a month, for example, gives our subscribers the benefits of unlimited or bucket services at a lower effective price per day, and the convenience of longer validity,”

Sun recently launched two new Call & Text Combo variants – the Call and Text Combo 50 and Call and Text Combo 150 – which give subscribers more calls and texts within the Sun network, texts to other networks, plus longer validity of 5 and 15 days, respectively. It also introduced a new Text Unlimited load – the Text Unlimited 60 – which offers unlimited Sun texts and an hour of Sun calls all valid for 7 days. Currently, Sun also offers Unlimited Text 300 which gives subscribers unlimited Sun texts, texts to other networks, and calls to Sun, Smart, and Talk N Text valid for 30 days.

Lumanlan said that the launch of new prepaid SIMs and the enhanced features of the existing ones helped Sun acquire new subscribers from different demographic and social groups. “We put extra effort in better understanding our subscribers so that we can offer them the best value products that suit their needs, budgets and preferences.” he concluded.



In search for solutions
Read 358 times | Posted on August 31, 2012 @ 6 years ago


In search for solutions

By Harry Tambuatco

we find ourselves in frustration whichever way we turn with corruption deeply rooted into our systems. Our leaders have made careers out of their mandates positioning the rest of their families to maximize on what they call their bailiwicks’ (sick). Imagine losing out on an opportunity (sick)? Our problems if you think about it are simply because we have no channels for redress and this is because of our dysfunctional courts. Now that we have a newly installed Chief Justice, I doubt there will even be changes with the rest of the motley crew adversarial to her entry. And rightfully so; should you be one of the senior Associate Justices, you’d probably do the same. Now if only our courts could produce resolutions to conflicts – we’d probably be more progressive. This does not only apply to the frustrating criminal cases that take decades (case in point – Hubert Web et. Al, and now the current Ampatuan massacre) but business conflict management issues. While the lawyers may play a role in this issue of procrastination together with the judges, the public is held hostage for the duration of any case. So unless we find a way to improve the services of the judiciary – we are doomed.

As for best practices we need to improve ourselves with the bad habits we have rationalized to be tradition. For example, always being late, never replying to formal communication, indecision, changing agreements to suit ones benefit – or simply put, to add value in our ways with morals and values to be in place. Then again our frustrations to date due to the courts compliment with our resourcefulness have mutated us into this animal of a survivor in this happy country we have. Now we come to the incompetent who rule us and execute the services we deserve coming from our taxes. Rather than address problems and source solutions, there is a seeming over excursion to launch outdated strategies a decade late. Ergo; our floods, inundations, conflict resolution towards land ownership and more… these are issues that only add to the problems we already have. Imagine fighting over land that we have not utilized for over half a century only to engage a bully we know we can only lose to, instead of channeling our given resources to food production. The insurgencies that surround us be it for the mythical religious contestations over governorship in lieu of progressive issues such like again, food production are stalled and wasted, keeping the people hungry and poorer.

My prayer is for nation building and unless we all together force improvements with our courts and the judiciary we cannot start any reform.



From Envisioning to Actualizing –The Digitization of Registry System for Basic Sectors in Agriculture
Read 506 times | Posted on August 31, 2012 @ 6 years ago


When Statistics Speak

By : Salvador A. Aves, Ph.D, DM.

From Envisioning to Actualizing –The Digitization of Registry System for Basic Sectors in Agriculture

I would like to start with a striking statement from Maxwell’s 17 Indisputable Laws of Teamwork, the” Law of the Niche” which says that “All players have a place where they add the most value.” And this is exactly what is going to happen- the convergence of various line agencies which puts the right people into their strength zones will definitely bring out success for the attainment of the goals and objectives of the Registry System for Basic Sectors in Agriculture (RSBSA) which purports to produce an electronic compilation of basic information on farmers, farm laborers, and fishermen, the target beneficiaries of agriculture-related programs and services.

This is perhaps the most awaited response to the lingering problems that beset the Philippine agriculture. We know for a fact that numerous tribulations are encountered by the Filipino farmers and fishermen. Accompanied by a lack of right knowledge to make the most out of their fields or catch, many Filipino farmers and fishermen are adhering to the traditions of the past, while wrestling problems of the present (not to mention the devastation brought about by climate change) and most probably attacking the emerging problems of the future. To make matters worse is the irony of seeing food producers suffering from hunger when harvest season has not yet come, since they had spent all their money on fertilizers and pesticides, while on the other hand, environmental problems had reduced our fishermen to lamentable state.

The grain of truth is this: “Filipino farmers and fishermen need not be poor. Filipino farmers and fishermen need not suffer. Filipino farmers and fishermen need not be tied to the bondage of poverty, True, in the past there had been solutions designed to alleviate their situation, but these farmers and fishermen were mere invisible faces. Their identity was not known. There was no record whom to assist. It was difficult to pin-point the exact persons who need direct assistance. Thus, there is an imperative need to know exactly whom to reach and where to reach them. In short, a reliable data base is essential.

However, problems must not stop us from looking for solutions. Management principles dictate that it does not need special talent to see problems, rather one has to think in terms of solutions in order to make a big difference. And the solution that has been crafted by the Department of Budget and Management (DBM) is the conceptualization of the Registry System for Basic Sectors in Agriculture, otherwise known as RSBSA.

As we all know, the RSBSA is a nationwide undertaking to list all farmers, farm laborers and fishermen and gather basic information about them, their household, farm and farming and/or fishing activities. With NSO as the statistical arm of the government and at the helm of this statistical undertaking, and with the combined efforts of the major agencies, specifically the Department of the Interior and Local Government, Department of Agriculture, Department of Agrarian Reform, the establishment of the envisioned database is certainly possible. With our concerted efforts, we can provide government planners and policy makers bases for effective formulation of significant policies and programs for agricultural development. With our teamwork, the digitization of information of the database registry of farmers, farm laborers and fishers, our government can pursue its effort in promoting transparency, accountability, participatory governance and strengthening of public relations.

Let us not forget the Chinese proverb which states that “behind an able man there are always other able men.” As stressed by Maxwell, “The truth is that teamwork is at the heart of great achievement. “
After all we owe those who are feeding all of us the genuine effort to assist them.



BusinessWeek Editorial : Active Involvement of Civil Society pays off for CEPALCO consumers
Read 462 times | Posted on August 31, 2012 @ 6 years ago

Active Involvement of Civil Society pays off for CEPALCO consumers

The active involvement of civil society groups in Cagayan de Oro and in key cities of Mindanao have resulted in the lowering of electricity rates in the franchise area of the Cagayan Electric Power and Light Co. (CEPALCO) at a time when they are rising in Manila, Luzon and other key cities in the Visayas and Mindanao.

Credit should be made to the active involvement of civic society groups in contesting the proposed rate hikes of power generators and distributors.

During the infamous brownouts of 2010, a coalition of consumer groups, civil society and religious groups, chambers of commerce, and ironically, even private utilities and rural electric cooperatives banded together to oppose the spike in electricity rates caused by the high generation rates charged by two power barges purchased by an affiliate of the Aboitiz Power Corporation.

With a little help from Rep. Rufus B. Rodriguez and Abante Mindanao Party List headed by his brother Rep. Maxie Rodriguez, the Energy Regulatory Commission (ERC) responded to their plea and issued a decision favoring the consumers. Although this decision was later amended to include a controversial provision allowing the company to include an appraised value roughly three times what Aboitiz paid for the barges, the coalition did not lose heart but filed a motion for reconsideration which the ERC thankfully allowed in a decision released on last August 14, 2012.

Thus, consumers all over the island would benefit from some refunds which would in effect lower everyone’s electricity bills all over Mindanao. Although the refund is expected to take some time since the generation company would first have to refund the amount to the National Grid Corporation of the Philippines (NGCP) which would next refund the private utilities and rural electric coops, who in turn would finally refund its consumers, it is nevertheless a positive thing to look forward to.

However, consumers within the CEPLACO franchise area would enjoy even further reductions in their power bills on top of the NGCP refund since the ERC earlier decided the utility would have to reduce their power rates from July 2012 to June 2016, or what is termed as the third regulatory period.

This heaven sent development should be properly attributed to the active intervention in the ERC case by the consumer group with the full support of civil society led by a coalition of civil society and professional and business associations like the MOFCCII, COFCCCII, PCCCI, Oro Chamber, COCI, PIAIA, and the local government through the City Council’s Energy Committee, assisted by the offices of the City Administrator, City Accountant and City Planning and Development during the hearing period covering 2010-2011. Private citizens in their own individual capacities also chipped in.

However, it appears civil society in general remains unaware or apathetic about the capacity for good people are capable of when they come together in support and in advocacy of worthy causes. Hopefully, God willing, this would change in time, the sooner, the better.



Curriculums in the 20TH and 21ST Centuries: A Comparative Reflection
Read 344 times | Posted on August 29, 2012 @ 6 years ago

On a School Leadership class in the Graduate School of Capitol University, Cagayan de Oro City with our mentor Prof. Olga C. Alonsabe, Ph.D., I have learned that the curriculums prevailed both in the 20TH and 21ST centuries differ in many ways.

For one thing, the 20TH century curriculum is teacher–centered while the 21ST century curriculum is student–centered. This is then an apparent disparity between the two curriculums. With today’s worldview on modern pedagogy, teachers who facilitate instructional activities that require students–in–action are considered assets in the educational arena. Outputs held by the students themselves are given great appreciation not only by the teachers but by the whole system. This is indeed a blatant and flamboyant improvement in pedagogy of teaching nowadays which was obviously not seen from that of the curriculum in the former century.

Second, there was a fragmented curriculum in the previous century whereas today; we have an integrated interdisciplinary curriculum. With President Aquino III’s flagship program on K–to–12, students are now faced with interdisciplinary instruction in each of the learning areas – thus making the students versatile in many ways as their teachers prepare them for greater academic challenges in the future. The 20TH century curriculum makers and developers failed to foresee how limited would be the impact of their curriculum design to the holistic learning of the students.

Third, the curriculum in the former century is textbook–driven while the curriculum in the latter century is research–driven. As students in the present are as objective as they are, they consistently tend to seek for an existing problem and later provide scientific explanation to respond to the occurrences of such. With the implementation of today’s curriculum, the bookish style and the dependency to textbooks in the former century have eventually come to an end.

Fourth, the curriculum in the 20TH century had focused on student memorization whereas today’s curriculum; it focuses on what students know. Thrusts on rote memory are mainly and mostly practiced among Asian Nations. But in the advent of Western model of ladderized education which Asian Nations have eventually adapted, there occurred a shift of paradigm from rote memorization to logical and critical thinking. For that, the Higher Order Thinking Skills are now given great emphasis in all learning areas, making the learners in the 21ST century more competent and competitive.

And lastly, the 20TH century curriculum ignored the diversity of the students whereas nowadays; the diversity of learners has been given full attention by both the curriculum makers and the teachers as forerunners and front liners of such educational implementation. This particular aspect has been implemented even before the advent of K–to–12. One proof of these is the implementation of the National Competency–Based Teachers Standards in 2009 where diversity of learners has been embedded in its first component.

From what I have learned from the discussion and sharing that we had in the class, I now realize that behind the numerous definitions and thoughts entwined to curriculum itself; by simple understanding, the curriculum drives the everyday functioning of the school. I further realize that although the educational curriculum in the previous century is now seen as less competitive than the curriculum now in the 21ST century, still there must be something better about the former – in some aspects – than the latter. This is because there has been multitude of successful students who happened to be scientists and professionals; who are at the same time undoubtedly products of the curriculum in the previous century.

As a Ph.D. student of Educational Management, I believe that the prevailing curriculum must be evaluated well. After all, it is through evaluation and further evaluation where a certain educational program, legislation or implementation can be better. One more thing teachers like me should make it sure is the avoidance of upholding negative reactions to such implementation considering that we belong to the system where we should instead pour our trust and support. I further believe that by modeling trust and support to the organization or school where we belong, the other members will replicate in the end what they will see and get from us.



Rufus to Lagman: Don’t call us extremists
Read 720 times | Posted on August 29, 2012 @ 6 years ago

PLEASE, don’t call us extremists and malevolent.

Cagayan de Oro City Rep. Rufus Rodriguez, one of many House members opposed to the Reproductive Health (RH) bill, addressed this appeal to Albay Rep. Edcel Lagman, one of the measure’s authors.

“Congressman Lagman and those supporting the proposed RH law should not resort to name-calling. They should stick to the issues and engage us in civilized debate. Resorting to name-calling is un-parliamentary,” he said.

“Being pro-life is not extremism. On the contrary, it is those who advocate killing life at conception, which is
what the RH bill is all about, who are extremists,” Rodriguez said.

He urged Lagman and other authors “to marshal their forces, if they have enough, to get the bill moving.”

“They always lack enough warm bodies in the session hall. It is they who are delaying the proceedings, not us,” he said.

“We who are opposed to the bill will always attend the session to assert our rights and to block this measure, which will promote a culture of abortion,” he added.

Lagman has denied that the proposed law would promote abortion.

Over the weekend, he labelled those opposed to the bill as extremists for opposing proposed amendments that would respond to their criticisms and address their concerns.

They would block the measure, even if only a comma remains of it, he said.

Representatives Jeanette Garin of Iloilo and Kimi Cojuangco of Pangasinan, Lagman’s co-authors, accused anti-RH congressmen of abusing the rules of the House by making privilege speeches to delay the bill’s consideration.

Speaker Feliciano Belmonte Jr. has promised to come up with rules that could get the proposed RH legislation moving again.
Last Aug. 6, the House overwhelmingly voted to end debates on the bill.

Meanwhile, Senator Miriam Defensor-Santiago came to the defense of faculty members of the Ateneo de Manila University who have been subjected to threats from the Catholic church for taking a position supporting the RH bill.
“That is an infringement of the constitutional right to academic freedom enshrined in the Constitution. You cannot dictate on a professor what to teach. This is a backward looking message. You can no longer punish Catholics for their freedom of conscience,” said Santiago who is also co-author and sponsor of the RH bill.

“The Catholic is not supposed to swallow everything that is recited by a cleric, whether he is a parish priest or a bishop. Only the Pope can dictate and that is only when he categorically claims that he is speaking ex cathedra in his role as supreme pontiff,” she added.

On the other hand, in spite of their differences over the RH bill, Senate Majority Leader Vicente Sotto said that he would be the first to defend Senator Pia Cayetano from allegations of plagiarism.

Sotto, just like Cayetano, was also accused of plagiarism by an American blogger and pro-RH bill advocates in his speeches against the controversial measure.

The allegation against Cayetano came after the attacks against Sotto and was contained in a blog, the contents of which were distributed to the members of the media.

Sotto was supposed to deliver a privilege speech last Wednesday in response to the attacks against him by American blogger Sarah Pope and the pro-RH groups but this had to be postponed in deference to the death of Interior and Local Government Secretary Jesse Robredo.

He said that his response to the “hatchet job” against him would have to come next Tuesday and then the last part of his presentation against the RH bill would be on Wednesday.

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