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Archive for February, 2013





Dili mabuntog
Read 387 times | Posted on February 28, 2013 @ 5 years ago

Closas

Special Gospel of the day: Mateo11:11-15(February28, 2013-Thursday)Mateo11:12-sukad sa mga adlaw ni Juan nga Bautista hangtud karon, ang gingharian sa langit nakaagum na sa mga paglugos, ug kini ginaagaw sa mga manglolugos pinaagig kusog.Sa Mateo16:18- ang “iglesia katolika” gitukod ug gisaaran nga “dili mabuntog” sa kamatayon.Sa Buhat8:1-ang iglesia nakasinati ug mabangis nga pagpasipala. Ang barometro nga ang atong pundok mao gayud ang matuod kay wala gayud matarog.

Sa Mateo 28:19-20- gisugo sa pagwali sa tibuok kalibotan ug gisaaran nga paga-ubanan hangtod sa kahangtoran.Sa World history by Webster page 211- ang iglesia katolika gitukod sa 33 AD sa Jerusalem.Sa Mateo21:43- gibalhin sa laing dapit nga mao ang Roma.Sa Buhat 23:11- gisugo ni Kristo si Pablo nga magwali sa Roma. Sa 1 Pedro3:15( Ang Biblia Version)- si Pedro nahiadto sa Roma.

Sa My First history of the church page 17- gipatay si Pedro ug Pablo sa Roma.Unsay nahitabo sa iglesia sa Roma?Sa Roam 1:7-8- kini mikaylap sa tibuok kalibotan ug gani kini nahimong centro sa pangagamhang universal sa atong balaang tinuohan. Logically speaking, madugtong nato gikan karon 2012 balik ngadto sa 1st century pinasikad sa daghang “lig-ong proyba” ug basihanan. Proud ka ba isip Romano Katoliko?Tingalig mura kas uban nga iyang gikaulaw ang atong simbahan, pagpangoros, Rosaryohan ug Santos nga Misa.Mao kini ang “tawong walay baroganan”.Sa Mateo 14:6- giputlan ug liog si Juan magbubunyag ni Herodes tungod sa iyang pagbarog sa kamatuoran.Ikaw, dili kaba balimbing ug talawan?SPONSORED:Neneth-BobongBalino-Dr.Edith,PhD-TonyJordan-DO.SanPedro Calungsod, iampo mo kami! Listen: Radio Ultra AM-1188-3:00 PM-Sunday!



Bloom
Read 358 times | Posted on February 28, 2013 @ 5 years ago

dannug

The idea of sustaining sustainable development is a wise one.

Search me. I think the only time that development is broached about, regrettably, is when it is paired with growth. Like growth and development.

Can there be growth without development?

It’s happening, according to economists in the NEDA. It’s hard to understand the language used to explain this phenomenon.

It means there’s a little more money in the pockets of wage earner; there’s plenty of dough in the hands of the bank and those doing business selling goods and service, and there’s travelling around for sights and sounds, and other consumeristics ( the gymnastics of spending).

But, and there’s the big BUT–there’s no capital investment visible for miles, like new industries, no factories, no export of finished goods, no infrastructure support to agri-fisheries. In short, there’s no visible signs of change above ground on many economic activities.

Sounds like there’s dead investment, but many people are happy just the same. Looks like the place is nice and safe, but something’s wrong?

An example would be: there are more cell phones roaring around like lions looking for comfort than actual business bytes and investment offers.

So, that’s the bloom that’s in the title of this column. There’s blooming–flowers all around–but no extraction of scents and pleasant odors to place into bottles for selling. Value addition is down,

There’s no perfumery industry here like in France, so that’s not good by way of illustration. There is banana though, but a lot of the fruit is not consumed or converted into new products. I could be wrong; prove me wrong.

In Davao. once. I saw a lot of sub-sized green bananas used as earth fill. And we eat Cavendish throwaways at P.50.

Cassava into flour? There’s your cake. There’s future here for everybody. But we import flour even as far away as Turkey!

Tourism requires a lot of infra, But are we building enough? By whose standards? Are the beaches clean and free of ecoli or effluents?

There’s a city I know in whose sidewalks the poor and needy sleep like they were born into it. I could cry laughing at this, but the garbage is also four days old.

But development is more than these, and ships and ports and airports and resorts. It is more than increasing reliability on information technology (IT), although it’s great help.

It’s also the quality of the skills that our people possess. It’s also the raw aspiration of the youth as they acquire skills in all dimensions.

There’s no one-to-one correspondence of skills to job. But our young people can assume responsibility for working on their future. Are the schools attentive to this? If the answer is yes, then there’s an ounce of hope.

Then. we don’t need the NPA to shut out the road to Cam Phillips and to announce anything of significance from Dahilayan.

Then we don’t need politicians to reconnoiter the future for our children.

Then we don’t expect the planners to rebuke us when there’s no development, but only growth.

Re-quote for the week: “Who knows if God will not change his mind and relent, if he will not renounce his burning wrath, so that we do not perish? God saw their efforts to renounce their evil behavior, and God relented: he did not inflict on them the disaster which he had threatened,”- Jonah 3:9-10. ([email protected])



Problema sa bandalismo
Read 495 times | Posted on February 28, 2013 @ 5 years ago

Pelone

DILI gayud tiaw ang kadaut ug perwisyo niadtong mga tag-iya sa mga gambalay ug sakyanan tungod sa problem sa walay kasulbaran nga bandalismo dinhi sa Cagayan de Oro ug Misamis Oriental.

Dili gayud tiaw kini nga problema kay pananglitan mopalit ka og sakyanan unya adunay marka nga 4 x 4. Imong giparada, pagbalik nimo ang imong 4 x 4 naa nay 4 x 4 = 8 unya kay sayop man naingon ani ang bandal: 4 x 4 = 8 = 16.

Usa ka gamay nga garas apan dugang gasto unya alang niadtong mga tag-iya sa sakyanan.

Ang mga bag-ong pintal nga gambalay daghan kaayo og bandal nga dili pud nimo masabtan kung tawo ba ang nagsulat o “alien.”

Maayo na lang ning uban kay ang ila mang lawas ang ilang gibandalan. Okay na kay wala man silay naperwisyo nga laing tawo.

Nalipay ako sa dihang akong nabasahan ang balita nga ang komitiba sa police and public safety nagtagbo aron hisgutan ang problema sa bandalismo sa dakbayan sa Cagayan de Oro.

Ambot kung ang Misamis Oriental aduna bay lakang mahitungod sa maong problema kay hilom man.

Ang komitiba sa City Council miingon nga sila adunay plano nga mohimo og Task Force Anti-Vandalism aron mapakusgan pa ang kampanya sa bandalismo. Aw diay!

Apan unsa bay pakusgan nga wala na may balita kung unsay nahitabo human sa maong “PR” as in press release sa City Council. Hahay!

Angaya gyud unta nga hatagan sa mga opisyales sa dakbayan ang bandalismo kay hugaw kaayo tan-awon ang dakbayan.

Ang mas labaw nga nakahatag sa kahugaw mao kanang mga gipikit sa poste nga mga pulyito (leaflet).

Tan-awa gani ninyo kanang naa gipangpikit diha sa mga poste sa kuryente sa Cepalong, makita nimo ang nagkalaing-laing pulyito. adunay nangita og yaya, nars, drayber, part time kunohay nga trabaho ug uban pa.

Ang nakapait kay dili kita kasiguro nga tinud-anay ang maong hiring kay dili man kini regulated sa dakbayan.

Amboy kung duna bay balaod bahin niining pagpamikit og mga pulyito diha sa poste sa kuryente ug bisan asang lugar–mapader man o ma koral sa mga kabalayan.

Mosamot kini nga problema kay daghan na pud nga politiko ang mopikit sa ilang mga dagway diha sa poste, pader, o bisan sa basurahan.

Angayan gyud nga magpatuman og estriktong balaod bahin niini nga problema kung gusto nato nga malimpyohan ang atong kadalanan.

Angayan nga idili gayud ang pagpamikit sa bisan unsang matang sa pahibalo diha sa mga poste, pader ug drum sa basurahan. Pangutana. Aduna bay makadakop?



FDCUI to invest P30-B in energy sector in MisOr
Read 286 times | Posted on February 28, 2013 @ 5 years ago

CAGAYAN DE ORO CITY—The Filinvest Development Corp. Utilities, Inc. (FDCUI) will be investing P30 billion to the energy sector in Mindanao by putting up its own 405-MegaWatt circulating fluidized bed (CFB) coal-fired thermal power plant in an 84-hectare area within the Phividec Industrial Estate in Villanueva, Misamis Oriental.

The plant, which will be in operation for the next 25 years, will source 80 percent of its coal requirement abroad and 20% from local coal mines, said Ana Margarita “Miren” Sanchez, FDCUI corporate communications manager.

Sanchez said that while FDCUI strongly believes in renewable sources of energy, it chose to invest in a coal-fired power plant “despite the many challenges from many groups” because (1) coal-fired power plant has short construction period; (2) it is the most feasible at present; and (3) coal is readily available.

“We cannot rely for a long time on fossil fuels. We should use renewable energy where there is available. But we should take advantage of what is available now, and that is coal. In the Philippines, technology to harness renewable sources of energy is still financially prohibitive and we cannot wait any longer to address the energy crisis in our country, especially here in Mindanao,” she said.

As of 2012, Mindanao had an energy shortfall of 92 MegaWatts, which is projected to increase to a shortfall of 121 MW by 2016 “even with committed utilities on board.”

The Misamis Oriental 3×135 MW CFB Coal-Fired Thermal Power Project, to be set up by FDCUI and FDC Misamis Power Corp., will be using the Rankine Cycle Thermal Plant with CFB combustion technology boiler for a more efficient use of coal.

The advantages of using CFB compared to the traditional coal-fired power plant like Steag’s is that CFB “doesn’t have to operate on very high temperature of 800 to 850 degrees to generate electricity.”

“High heat generates elements that can contribute to acid rain,” Sanchez said.

Also, the plant’s boiler is designed to allow limestone to be injected to capture sulphur and convert this into calcium sulphate.

“The system also effectively captures sulphur oxides (SOx) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) at 95% efficiency rate, aside from eliminating fugitive coal dust,” she added.

Sanchez explained that the rankine cycle system was chosen because FDCUI is committed to protecting the integrity of the environment.

In the Rankine cycle system, also known as Rankine thermodynamic cycle, the steam is produced by the boiler, where water pumped into the boiler (“feedwater”) passes through a series of tubes to capture heat released by coal combustion and then boils under high pressure to become superheated steam. The superheated steam leaving the boiler then enters the steam turbine throttle, where it powers the turbine and connected generator to make electricity. After the steam expands through the turbine, it exits the back end of the turbine into the surface condenser, where it is cooled and condensed back to water. This condensate is then returned to the boiler through high-pressure feed pumps for reuse.

Heat from the condensing steam is normally rejected to cooling water circulated through the condenser which then goes to a surface water body, such as a river, or to an on-site cooling tower.

“As a plant, it will certainly generate CO2 and we don’t want to add to the CO2 in the atmosphere,” she stressed, adding that the system uses the “clean coal technology.”

“Clean coal technology is proven worldwide as safe and efficient,” she explained while showing pictures of CFB coal-fired power plant sitting right next to shopping malls in Taiwan and other places.

The first and second units of the plant are scheduled to start operation in 2016 while the third unit is scheduled in 2018.

As of press time, FDC Misamis Power Corp./FDCUI is in the process of finalizing electricity power purchase agreements (EPPAs) with several Mindanao electric cooperatives. (Bong D. Fabe)



Basic services availment at Bayanihan Village explained
Read 291 times | Posted on February 28, 2013 @ 5 years ago

By Melvin T. Anggot, Virgilio C. Garcia

ILIGAN City – The city government have conducted a consultation-meeting recently with beneficiaries of the housing program of Bayanihan Village at Sta. Elena, this city.

During the activity, the beneficiaries were informed of the availment power, water, drainage system, opportunities of livelihood and other basic services.

Mr. Rey Roque, head of Housing and Resettlement Office, said they have invited representatives from the Iligan Light and Power Incorporated, Iligan City Waterworks Systems Office, Department of Public Works and Highways, City Social Welfare and Development Office, Cooperative Development and Livelihood Office, Gawad Kalinga and Habitat of Humanity.

Mr. Roque added, no house raffle will be held for would-be transferees to housing units at Bayanihan Village.



GSIS calls for accreditation renewal of liaison officers
Read 363 times | Posted on February 28, 2013 @ 5 years ago

By Apipa P. Bagumbaran

CAGAYAN de Oro City – The Government Service Insurance System (GSIS) Cagayan de Oro Branch has called on government agencies within the Branch’s operational jurisdiction to renew the accreditation of their respective agency liaison officers.

Application for renewal must be submitted to the GSIS, through the administrative staff of the Office of the Branch Manager, not later than February 28, this year.

Branch Manager Ma. Cecilia G. Vega said documents that must be submitted should include a letter of authorization or office order from the head of office designating a particular employee of the agency as the liaison officer, properly filled-up and notarized information/designation sheet, and duly filed-up form for Enhanced Personal Accident Insurance.

A liaison officer must be an employee or a member of good standing with no pending criminal and/or administrative case and without derogatory record on file.

He/she will be responsible in disseminating to his co-workers accurate information about new or revised policies, rules and procedures in transacting with the GSIS.

The liaison officer will also ensure that the forms and documents required in filing of claims are properly filled-up, complete and duly endorsed by the authorized officials prior to submission to the GSIS Members Assistance Unit.

In addition to the renewal of accreditation, Vega also requested government agencies to submit duly accomplished Agency Information Sheet containing the agency profile of authorized officers/persons-in-charge with their corresponding specimen signatures for GSIS file and reference. (APB/PIA-10/jdelpf)



Application for local absentee voting now accepted
Read 277 times | Posted on February 28, 2013 @ 5 years ago

By Jasper Marie Oblina-Rucat

CAGAYAN de Oro City – The Commission on Elections Region 10 (Comelec-10) is now accepting applications from government officials and members, AFP and PNP for local absentee voting not later than March 15; and members of media not beyond March 31.

In Resolution No. 9637, early voting for members of the mass media in the May 2013 is allowed, as they may not be able to vote on election day due to news coverage and reporting of the conduct of elections.

Acting COMELEC Regional Director Noli R. Pipo said, government officials and employees, including the AFP and the PNP are allowed to vote for national positions in places where they are not registered, but where they are temporarily assigned to perform election duties, as provided under Executive Order No. 157 and Republic Act No. 7166.

As such, they can submit their applications to their heads of offices, supervisors and commanders.

Meanwhile the media can submit to either the office of the Provincial Election Supervisor (OPES) where they are registered as a voters, or the Office of the City Election Officer (OCEO), in case of highly-urbanized or independent cities, such as Iligan and Cagayan de Oro City.

Local absentee voters shall vote any day from April 28, 29, and 30 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. under the direct supervision and presence of the municipal, city, district EO or his representative; or the PES or his representative.

On the other hand, voting of government officials and employees, the AFP and PNP, head of office/supervisor/commander shall not be later than April 15 provided there is a written notice upon the municipal/city/district EO.

Further, media voters shall vote in the Comelec office where they filed their applications to avail the local absentee voting. Specifically, local absentee voters shall vote not earlier than 15 days before the elections nor later than 12 days before the elections.

According to Atty. Pipo, the May 13 synchronized national, local and ARMM regional elections, absentee voters can only vote for the positions of senators and Party-List representative. (JMOR-PIA10/asf)



Heavy equipment servicing training malampuson
Read 325 times | Posted on February 28, 2013 @ 5 years ago

Sinulat ni Arjay S. Felicilda, News Editor

CAGAYAN de Oro City – Malampuson ang Heavy Equipment Servicing NC II nga gipasi-ugdahan sa Monark Foundation, Incorporated ug San Roque Metals Inc. sa Tubay, Agusan del Norte kaniadtong Hunyo sa miaging tuig.

Ang siyam ka trainees maoy naglangkob sa ikatulong hugpong nga gipadala ngadto sa Laguna alang sa on-the-job training (OJT) sa kompaniyang Monark.
Human sa OJT, sila awtomatikong kuhaon, isip mga trabahante sa SRMI.

Kahinumdoman nga kaniadtong Hunyo 12, sa miaging tuig, giimplementar ang bansaybansay mahitungod sa hydraulic excavator (NC II), ubos sa TESDA.

Ang maong training nga gisalmotan sa 25 ka tawo gikan mga barangay sa La Fraternidad, Santa Ana, Binuangan ug Poblacion Dos, gidumala ni Ginong Rosendo Cruiz nga accredited sa TESDA.

Gipahigayon usab ang assessment examination nga naglangkob sa interview ug ‘hands-on’ alang sa Bulldozer NC II, Motor Grader NC II ug Wheel Loader NC II, pinaagi ni Engr. Edgar Cubillas, ang TESDA assessor.

Sa tulo ka adlaw nga assessment examination, pito ang nakapasar sa Bulldozer NC II, walo sa Motor Grader NC II ug 13 sa Wheel Loader.

Sa kinatibuk-an, adunay 28 ka trainees nga sertipikado na karon sa TESDA isip drayber/operator sa dagkong ekipo.



Toyota Offers Free Vehicle Safety Inspection this Summer
Read 287 times | Posted on February 28, 2013 @ 5 years ago

Summer is just around the corner and what better way to prepare for your long road trip than to have your Toyota checked by Toyota-certified technicians for free! Simply visit any of Toyota’s dealerships from February 25 to March 23 to avail of the Free 20-point vehicle safety inspection.

Furthermore, for your peace-of-mind, Toyota Motor Philippines Corporation will once again launch the Toyota Motorists Assistance this coming Holy Week – a service tradition for the past 22 years. From Maundy Thursday to Easter Sunday, service teams will be deployed in eight major destinations across Luzon to assist the motoring public in Bantay, Ilocos Sur; Rosario, La Union; Baguio City, Benguet; Urdaneta, Pangasinan; Tagaytay City; Calamba, Laguna; Lucena City, Quezon; and Sipocot, Camarines Sur. The service teams will provide free roadside assistance and repairs to all vehicles with emergency concerns, regardless of makes and models.

The Toyota Motorists Assistance Campaign is in partnership with Toyota Dealers, Chevron Philippines Inc.; Philippine Auto Components (Denso), Inc.; Du Pont Far East, Inc.; Emicor, Inc; 3M Philippines, Inc.; Fujitsu Ten Corporation of the Philippines; Paint Marketing Co. Phils., Inc.; Federal Chemicals (Akzonobel), Inc.; Bridgestone; OE Works Manufacturing, Three Bond Singapore Pte. Ltd and Smart Q Systems Co., Inc.

With Toyota you can be sure of safe and worry-free road trips this summer!



Tangub City HisCom conducts memorial lecture
Read 294 times | Posted on February 28, 2013 @ 5 years ago

By Judith B. Tablan

TANGUB City – The Tangub City Historical Commission (TCHC) will hold its 5th Alfonso D. Tan Memorial Lecture, this morning, February 28, at the City Function Hall 1.

To be held in line with the 45th anniversary celebration of the city, the activity will focus on the theme: “Talagsaon ang Tawo nga Nag-una sa Iyang Panahon” (Seldom is a Man Who is Ahead of His Time).

The memorial lecture is part of TCHC’s advocacy, through the years to imbue among the younger generation, particularly the students, the value of service, loyalty and commitment to the local patrimony.

Invited lecturer is City Councilor Cecilio C. Sultan, a close associate of the late Alfonso D. Tan, founding father of Tangub City.

Meanwhile, Narcisa Naron, TCHC general commissioner, will open the activity, while Prof. Emelio Pascual from the city-funded Gov. Alfonso D. Tan College (GADTC) and TCHC consultant will speak on the “Possibilities and Potentials of Local History.”

Dr. Jennifer W. Tan, former city mayor and founder of the TCHC, and Mayor Philip Tan will give their messages. (Judith B. Tablan/RCAguhob/PIA10-Misamis Occidental/asf)

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