WELCOME TO THE BUSINESSWEEK MINDANAO GROUP OF NEWSPAPERS.
BusinessWeek Mindanao (November 13, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (November 13, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (November 12, 2015)Mindanao Daily Caraga (November 12, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (November 11, 2015)Mindanao Daily Caraga (November 11, 2015)BusinessWeek Mindanao (November 10-11, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (November 10, 2015)BusinessWeek Mindanao (November 9, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (November 9, 2015)Mindanao Daily Caraga (November 9, 2015)CDOTIMES (November 7-13, 2015)BusinessWeek Mindanao (November 6, 2015)Mindanao Daily News (November 6, 2015)Mindanao Daily News (November 5, 2015)BusinessWeek Mindanao (November 4, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (November 4, 2015)BusinessWeek Mindanao (November 2-3, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (November 2-3, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (October 30, 2015)BusinessWeek Mindanao (October 30, 2015)BusinessWeek Mindanao (October 29, 2015)BusinessWeek Mindanao (October 28, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (October 28, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (October 27, 2015)BusinessWeek Mindanao (October 26, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (October 26, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (October 25, 2015)The Cagayan Times (October 24-30, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (October 24, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (October 23, 2015)Businessweek Mindanao (October 22-23, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (October 22, 2015)Mindanao Daily Caraga (October 22, 2015)BusinessWeek Mindanao (October 21, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (October 21, 2015)Mindanao Daily Caraga (October 21, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (October 20, 2015)Mindanao Daily Caraga (October 20, 2015)BusinessWeek Mindanao (October 19, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (October 19, 2015)Mindanao Daily Caraga (October 19, 2015)CDOTIMES (October 17-23, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (October 17, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (October 16, 2015)BusinessWeek Mindanao (October 15-16, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (October 15, 2015)BusinessWeek Mindanao (October 13-14, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (October 14, 2015)Mindanao Daily Caraga (October 14, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (October 13, 2015)Mindanao Daily Caraga (October 13, 2015)BusinessWeek Mindanao (October 12, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (October 12, 2015)Mindanao Daily Caraga (October 12, 2015)CDOTIMES (October 10-16, 2015)BusinessWeek Mindanao (October 8-9, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (October 9, 2015)Mindanao Daily Caraga (October 9, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (October 8, 2015)BusinessWeek Mindanao (October 6-7, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (October 7, 2015)Mindanao Daily Caraga (October 7, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (October 6, 2015)Mindanao Daily Caraga (October 6, 2015)BusinessWeek Mindanao (October 5, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (October 5, 2015)CDOTIMES (October 3-9, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (October 3, 2015)BusinessWeek Mindanao (October 2, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (October 2, 2015)Mindanao Daily Caraga (October 2, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (October 1, 2015)Mindanao Daily Business (October 1, 2015)BusinessWeek Mindanao (September 30, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (September 30, 2015)Mindanao Daily Business (September 30, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (September 29, 2015)BusinessWeek Mindanao (September 28-29, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (September 28, 2015)Mindanao Daily Davao (September 28, 2015)CDOTIMES (September 26-October 2, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (September 25, 2015)BusinessWeek Mindanao (September 24-25, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (September 24, 2015)Mindanao Daily Business (September 24, 2015)BusinessWeek Mindanao (September 23, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (September 23, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (September 22, 2015)Mindanao Daily Business (September 22, 2015)BusinessWeek Mindanao (September 21-22, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (September 21, 2015)CDOTIMES (September 18-25, 2015)BusinessWeek Mindanao (September 19-20, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (September 19, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (September 18, 2015)BusinessWeek Mindanao (September 17-18, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (September 17, 2015)Mindanao Daily Business (September 17, 2015)BusinessWeek Mindanao (September 16, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (September 16, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (September 15, 2015)BusinessWeek Mindanao (September 14-15, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (September 14, 2015)Mindanao Daily Business (September 14, 2015)CDOTIMES (September 12-18, 2015)BusinessWeek Mindanao (September 11, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (September 11, 2015)Mindanao Daily Business (September 11, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (September 10, 2015)Mindanao Daily Caraga (September 10, 2015)Mindanao Daily Business (September 10, 2015)BusinessWeek Mindanao (September 9, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (September 9, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (September 8, 2015)Mindanao Daily Caraga (September 8, 2015)Mindanao Daily Business (September 8, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (September 7, 2015)Mindanao Daily Caraga (September 7, 2015)Mindanao Daily Business (September 7, 2015)BusinessWeek Mindanao (September 6-8, 2015)CDOTIMES (September 5-11, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (September 4, 2015)Mindanao Daily Business (September 4, 2015)BusinessWeek Mindanao (September 3-4, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (September 3, 2015)Mindanao Daily Business (September 3, 2015)BusinessWeek Mindanao (September 2, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (September 2, 2015)Mindanao Daily Caraga (September 2, 2015)Mindanao Daily Business (September 2, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (September 1, 2015)Mindanao Daily Business (September 1, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (August 31, 2015)Mindanao Daily Caraga (August 31, 2015)Mindanao Daily Business (August 31, 2015)BusinessWeek Mindanao (August 30 - September 1, 2015)CDOTIMES (August 29 - September 4, 2015)Mindanao Daily News (August 29, 2015)BusinessWeek Mindanao (August 28, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (August 28, 2015)Mindanao Daily Business (August 28, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (August 27, 2015)Mindanao Daily Caraga (August 27, 2015)Mindanao Daily Business (August 27, 2015)BusinessWeek Mindanao (August 26, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (August 26, 2015)Mindanao Daily Caraga (August 26, 2015)Mindanao Daily Business (August 26, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (August 25, 2015)Mindanao Daily Business (August 25, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (August 24, 2015)Mindanao Daily Business (August 24, 2015)BusinessWeek Mindanao (August 23-24, 2015)CDOTIMES (August 22-28, 2015)BusinessWeek Mindanao (August 21, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (August 21, 2015)Mindanao Daily Business (August 21, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (August 20, 2015)Mindanao Daily Business (August 20, 2015)BusinessWeek Mindanao (August 19, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (August 19, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (August 18, 2015)Mindanao Daily Business (August 18, 2015)BusinessWeek Mindanao (August 17, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (August 17, 2015)Mindanao Star (August 15-21, 2015)CDOTIMES (August 15-21, 2015)BusinessWeek Mindanao (August 14-15, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (August 14, 2015)Mindanao Daily Caraga (August 14, 2015)Mindanao Daily Business (August 14, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (August 13, 2015)Mindanao Daily Caraga (August 13, 2015)Mindanao Daily Business (August 13, 2015)BusinessWeek Mindanao (August 12, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (August 12, 2015)Mindanao Daily Caraga (August 12, 2015)Mindanao Daily Business (August 12, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (August 11, 2015)Mindanao Daily Caraga (August 11, 2015)Mindanao Daily Business (August 11, 2015)BusinessWeek Mindanao (August 10, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (August 10, 2015)Mindanao Daily Caraga (August 10, 2015)Mindanao Daily Business (August 10, 2015)CDOTIMES (August 8-14, 2015)BusinessWeek Mindanao (August 7, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (August 7, 2015)Mindanao Daily Caraga (August 7, 2015)Mindanao Daily Business (August 7, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (August 6, 2015)Mindanao Daily Business (August 6, 2015)BusinessWeek Mindanao (August 5, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (August 5, 2015)Mindanao Daily Caraga (August 5, 2015)Mindanao Daily Business (August 5, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (August 4, 2015)Mindanao Daily Caraga (August 4, 2015)Mindanao Daily Business (August 4, 2015)BusinessWeek Mindanao (August 3, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (August 3, 2015)Mindanao Daily Caraga (August 3, 2015)Mindanao Daily Business (August 3, 2015)Mindanao Daily News (August 1, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (July 31, 2015)Mindanao Daily Business (July 31, 2015)BusinessWeek Mindanao (July 30-31, 2015)CDOTIMES Commemorative Edition (July 31, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (July 30, 2015)Mindanao Daily Business (July 30, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (July 29, 2015)Mindanao Daily Caraga (July 29, 2015)Mindanao Daily Business (July 29, 2015)BusinessWeek Mindanao (July 28-29, 2015)CDOTIMES (July 25-30, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (July 28, 2015)Mindanao Daily Caraga (July 28, 2015)Mindanao Daily Business (July 28, 2015)BusinessWeek Mindanao (July 27, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (July 27, 2015)Mindanao Daily Business (July 27, 2015)BusinessWeek Mindanao (July 24-25, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (July 24, 2015)Mindanao Daily Caraga (July 24, 2015)Mindanao Daily Business (July 24, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (July 23, 2015)Mindanao Daily Business (July 23, 2015)BusinessWeek Mindanao (July 22-23, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (July 22, 2015)Mindanao Daily Caraga (July 22, 2015)Mindanao Daily Business (July 22, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (July 21, 2015)Mindanao Daily Caraga (July 21, 2015)Mindanao Daily Business (July 21, 2015)BusinessWeek Mindanao (July 20-21, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (July 20, 2015)Mindanao Daily Business (July 20, 2015)CDOTIMES (July 18-24, 2015)Mindanao Daily News (July 18, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (July 17, 2015)Mindanao Daily Business (July 17, 2015)Mindanao Daily Caraga (July 17, 2015)BusinessWeek Mindanao (July 16-17, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (July 16, 2015)Mindanao Daily Business (July 16, 2015)Mindanao Daily Caraga (July 16, 2015)BusinessWeek Mindanao (July 15-16, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (July 15, 2015)Mindanao Daily Business (July 15, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (July 14, 2015)Mindanao Daily Business (July 14, 2015)BusinessWeek Mindanao (July 13-14, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (July 13, 2015)Mindanao Daily Business (July 13, 2015)CDOTIMES (July 11-17, 2015)Mindanao Daily News (July 11, 2015)BusinessWeek Mindanao (July 10-11, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (July 10, 2015)Mindanao Daily Business (July 10, 2015)Mindanao Daily Caraga (July 10, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (July 9, 2015)Mindanao Daily Business (July 9, 2015)BusinessWeek Mindanao (July 8-9, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (July 8, 2015)Mindanao Daily Business (July 8, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (July 7, 2015)Mindanao Daily Business (July 7, 2015)BusinessWeek Mindanao (July 6-7, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (July 6, 2015)Mindanao Daily Business (July 6, 2015)Mindanao Daily News (July 5, 2015)CDOTIMES (July 4-10, 2015)Mindanao Daily News (July 4, 2015)BusinessWeek Mindanao (July 3-4, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (July 3, 2015)Mindanao Daily Business (July 3, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (July 2, 2015)Mindanao Daily Davao (July 2, 2015)Mindanao Daily Caraga (July 2, 2015)BusinessWeek Mindanao (July 1-2, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (July 1, 2015)Mindanao Daily Davao/Business (July 1, 2015)Mindanao Daily Caraga (July 1, 2015)Mindanao Daily Northmin (June 30, 2015)Mindanao Daily Davao (June 30, 2015)Mindanao Daily Caraga (June 30, 2015)

Archive for May, 2013





Order for manual count, Comelec told
Read 424 times | Posted on May 31, 2013 @ 6 years ago

BAYAN Muna Partylist Rep. Neri Colmenares yesterday reiterated his call for the Commission on Elections (Comelec) to order the manual counting of ballots considering the malfunctioning of many PCOs machines some of which did not function at all and had to be substituted, and ballots being rejected by the machine.

“The people’s constitutional right to suffrage should be the main concern of Comelec. It must do its utmost that all votes are counted and only a manual counting can remedy this situation,” said Rep. Colmenares.

“Voters whose ballots were rejected by the PCOS must insist that their votes be recorded and all rejected ballots must be counted by the BEIs and must be canvassed by the Board of Canvassers.

Comelec must order the BEIs to count the votes of those rejected by the PCOS. After all, it’s not the fault of the voter but of the machine.”

He said there are news reports where voters are already disenfranchised because of said hitches in the machines, either because of frustration with the delay or because of non-functioning PCOS.

He reiterated his call for voters to vote for those who they believe represent the voice of the impoverished majority instead of those from the wealthy politicians who only win through buying their votes.

On another note, Rep. Colmenares asked the Comelec to go after those who conducted vote buying.

“Vote buying practically obliterates whatever gains intended by automated elections. Vote buying is a crime committed in front of millions of witnesses all over the country, and Comelec need not resort to its controversial money ban if it is serious in going after vote buying. It is impossible for Comelec to claim that it has no evidence of vote buying because it is there staring on the faces of Comelec officials,” he said.

“After the elections, we should go after Smartmatic who practically committed estafa when it received billions of pesos without informing us that it does not own what it is selling. We should also go after Comelec officials even during the Melo commission who led us into this fraudulent transaction,” ended Rep. Colmenares.



Without faith it is impossible to please him
Read 390 times | Posted on May 31, 2013 @ 6 years ago

Closas

BY : BRO. EDCEL CLOSAS

Fresh Gospel of the day: Mark10:46-52(May30, 2013-Thursday Mark 10:46-52-And they came to Jericho: and as he went out of Jericho with his disciples and a great number of people, blind Bartimaeus, the son of Timaeus, sat by the highway side begging. And when he heard that it was Jesus of Nazareth, he began to cry out, and say, Jesus, [thou] Son of David, have mercy on me. And many charged him that he should hold his peace: but he cried the more a great deal, [Thou] Son of David, have mercy on me. And Jesus stood still, and commanded him to be called. And they call the blind man, saying unto him, Be of good comfort, rise; he calleth thee. And he, casting away his garment, rose, and came to Jesus. And Jesus answered and said unto him, What wilt thou that I should do unto thee? The blind man said unto him, Lord, that I might receive my sight. And Jesus said unto him, Go thy way; thy faith hath made thee whole. And immediately he received his sight, and followed Jesus in the way. Due to the “faith and efforts of this blind man,” Jesus pity on him and He cured this sickly person. Mark 11:22-24-And Jesus answering saith unto them, Have faith in God. For verily I say unto you, That whosoever shall say unto this mountain, Be thou removed, and be thou cast into the sea; and shall not doubt in his heart, but shall believe that those things which he saith shall come to pass; he shall have whatsoever he saith. Therefore I say unto you, What things soever ye desire, when ye pray, believe that ye receive [them], and ye shall have [them]. Hebrews 11:6-But “without faith [it is] impossible to please [him]:” for he that cometh to God must believe that he is, and [that] he is a rewarder of them that diligently seek him. What kind o f faith do you have?SPONSORED:Neneth – Bobong Balino- Dr. Edith, PhD- Tony Jordan – CDO. St. Peter Calungsod, pray for us! Listen: Radio Ultra AM-1188-3:00 PM – Sunday: #09284149490-09266607505: Question – Prayer request



Dysfunctional Philippines
Read 377 times | Posted on May 31, 2013 @ 6 years ago

Bacon II

BY : JESSE BACON II

Filipinos are undeniably an intellectually gifted race but it’s a real wonder why majority, meaning comprising about 60 percent of the total, of the Philippine population is mired in abject poverty.

Name a field of endeavor or profession where you can’t find a Filipino excelling in any field in the countries where Filipinos abound either as naturalized citizens of or overseas Filipinos working in those countries. And just think of this. Despite the so-called brain drain because of the migration to other countries of many of our professionals, we still are not lacking in talented and intelligent professionals making themselves available here for country and people.

As a young boy who grew up in the Queen City of the South, Cebu City, I could still vividly remember the city to be a place where everyone seemed to have a sense of belongingness to that community. All are Sugboanons and the non-Sugboanons are simply langyaws.

I grew up as a boy not conscious or mindful of any social or economic disparity between and among Sugboanons. Everyone buys in the same public market, Carbon or Taboan, and visit the same park, Fuente Osmena or Plaza Independencia. For other merchandise and grocery items, everyone buys them from among the small stores that were either owned by Chinese or Indian (Bombay) nationals who have opted to become residents of the city.

When I was in grade school in the city’s central school, I could still remember that one of my classmates was the youngest son of the city mayor then, Eulogio Borres. Not far from our modest home at the back of the United Church of Christ in the Philippines-owned Cebu Community Hospital now known as the Visayas Community Medical Center along the then Jones Ave. and now Osmena Blvd. were the homes of the late Don Sergio Osmena Sr. and the founder of the University of the Visayas, Don Vicente Gullas.

We were all Sugboanons with the Dakbayan sa Sugbo as our dearly beloved community. But everything slowly changed when the more affluent members of the Sugbo community started to live in exclusive enclaves such as Beverly Hills and Maria Luisa Estate Park. The Sugbo community that we once knew of started to diminish. Social status started to be emphasized.

The ordinariness of the life of the Sugbo community I knew of as a boy could be best illustrated by the fact that then city mayor Borres lived in one of the city’s densely populated districts, Pasil. In fact, even until now, the former mayor’s house still stands there.

The divide between the haves and the have not became more pronounced when the Gaisanos, who owned White Gold store, opted to become a giant in the retail trade business with the establishment of the first Gaisano superstore along Colon st., the oldest street in the country. The smaller stores such as Villamor and Sons, Oro Bonito folded up one after the other because they don’t have a chance competing with the Gaisanos especially when they built one superstore after another.

With everyone losing their sense of being a part of just one Sugbo community, dysfunction in the community started to set in. The Gaisanos became the retail business titans in Cebu and eventually in the Visayas and Mindanao without regard that with their growth they sent to oblivion several smaller stores. What happened was in direct conflict to the time-honored Chinese philosophy in business that called for each one helping another.

The situation has sadly become an each to he or she thing, something that was unknown or unheard of before. It has become a dog-eat-dog and survival of the fittest situation. The social dysfunction just became worse.

The dysfunction is also best illustrated with the widening of the gap between the rich and the poor that became more pronounced as the years passed by. Wealth generation became more concentrated in the hands of the few while the greater number of the populace became economically dependent on the new wielders of economic power. And with the current influx of other giant retailers in the once known Sugbo community by SM, Robinson’s and Ayala Malls, to mention just three, the dysfunction got worsened.

Sugboanons have now been transformed into a people shaped by the ways of materialism, a way of life that Pope Francis would like all devout Christians to curse. But what happened in Cebu City is actually what is happening in Cagayan de Oro and elsewhere in the country hence the present day dysfunction of the entire Filipino society.


(Reactions at [email protected] or at [email protected])



Deadlier than the bullets
Read 458 times | Posted on May 31, 2013 @ 6 years ago

Diaz

BY : CRIS DIAZ

IT pains us to hear stories of people killed for varied reasons. Often, there are questions why killings take place as common as the hour of the day. Robberies and hold-ups also become the menu of the day. Worse, robbers shot in cold blood their innocent preys. The most disturbing, however, is when a person commits suicide because of hunger.

A report on Thursday said that a 25-year-old mother committed suicide when hunger drew her for the past three days. The case took place in Cagayan de Oro City. The despondent mother walked out of their home Thursday, probably in search of food. Perhaps, the mother failed to find something to fill her stomach and her children that she went out to the sea where she reportedly allowed herself to drown. The fangs of hunger are deadlier than the bullets.

Perhaps, the incident could be an isolated one. Nonetheless, with reports of the same story happening in some areas in the country, one could simply be apprehensive. How extensive poverty is in a country that boosts of a robust economy?

The National Statistical Coordination Board of the National Statistics Office said that poverty incidence among population in the country was estimated at 27.9 percent in 2012. The same report said, “The subsistence incidence that represents proportion of Filipino families in extreme poverty was about 10 per cent.” It said that the NS0 measured poverty incidence or the proportion of people below the poverty line to the total population.

In Region 10, the poverty incidence among families was 35.6 percent with Misamis Oriental (the lowest) having a 25.0 percent poverty incidence. The highest in the region was Bukidnon with 43.3 percent poverty incidence.

One of the reasons of the high incidence of poverty in the country is the rising growth of unemployment. Despite the reported growth of gross domestic product (GDP) in along with the economic reform programs of the Aquino government in the last three years, the unemployment rate in the Philippines is still the worst unemployment rate in Asia, a survey released by the IBON Foundation said. IBON said that more than 11 million Filipinos are jobless.

IBON estimates that the number of unemployed Filipinos increased by 48,000 to reach 4.4 million and the number of underemployed by 349,000 to reach 7.5 million in 2012 – for a total of 11.9 million unemployed and underemployed. The unemployment rate remained at 10.5% while the underemployment rate increased significantly to 20.0% from 19.3% in 2011.

The SWS survey also corroborates the IBON survey during the first quarter of 2013. The SWS survey said that 11.1 million Filipinos are jobless based on March 2013 survey. According to SWS, the figure translates to 25.4 percent unemployment among Filipinos aged 18 and above.

It is understandable that the government will always have reasons to defend itself from these unwelcomed statistics. However, no amount of argument could cover up reports of people or an individual committing suicide because of hunger and poverty. This is the sad reality.

React: [email protected]



Massive gathering of vital seaweed alarms Surigaonons
Read 396 times | Posted on May 31, 2013 @ 6 years ago

By Roel Catoto

SURIGAO CITY (MindaNews) – The massive gathering of sargassum, the brownish floating seaweed commonly seen near the shore, has alarmed some concerned citizens in the city, fearing marine ecological imbalance.

Johanne Jake Miranda, dive master of the Surigao Dive Club, said he received several information from different island barangays in the city and in the neighboring islands of Dinagat, Siargao, and Bucas Grande that tons of sargassum are being transported continuously to the city everyday.

Miranda said this is quite alarming because this seaweed is essential to marine life.

Locally known as “samu,” Miranda said this seaweed must be protected otherwise there would be a drastic effect on the local marine life, eventually affecting fishermen, too.

He suggests that the Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources (BFAR) conduct a monitoring or study of the massive harvesting of sargassum.

Nerio Casil, regional director of BFAR-Caraga, told MindaNews that for now, there is no existing law prohibiting the harvest of sargassum. He thus urged local government units (LGUs) to pass ordinances as a way of regulating in gathering the seaweed.

A study conducted by marine biologists at the University of the Philippines in Diliman noted that sargassum is “economically important” because it is being used as animal feed and liquid fertilizers, among others.

But Ariel T. Ortiz and Gavino C. Trono Jr., of UP’s Marine Science Institute, noted that sargassum proliferates “in vast areas along coastal waters housing myriad life forms, making them one of the most ecologically important and productive communities.”

In their study published in the Science Diliman journal in 2000, the scientists noted that “in 1987, fishermen in Central Visayas and Northern Mindanao claimed a decline in fish stocks and other associated marine organisms after tons of Sargassum were harvested and exported for seaweed meal.”

In the United States, the South Atlantic Fishery Management Council considers sargassum as important in “provid(ing) crucial habitat for a wide variety of marine animals in the open ocean, including economically important pelagic species such as tuna, dolphin, wahoo and billfish as well as sea turtles and marine birds.”

Darwin Brian Lawas, a marine biologist of Green Mindanao Association, Inc., said the massive harvesting of sargassum must be controlled to prevent imbalance in the marine ecosystem that will affect fish and other living organisms. He said fishermen will suffer most in the long run.

Dried sargassum now sells P8 a kilo in the local market.

Tata Tribor, who works for one of the local sargassum buyers here, said they transport tons of dried samu to Cagayan de Oro City.

He said the seaweed is being exported to China.

Last year, City Councilor Christopher Bonite, chairperson of the committee on environment, had considered regulating harvest of the seaweed. But until today, he has not yet acted on it.

He said, he did not prioritize this matter because he learned that local buyers had stopped buying sargassum late last year.

Bonite said he did not expect the massive harvest of sargassum to resume.

Some island villagers are not happy with the massive gathering of the seaweed.

James Pejan, a Bantay Dagat member of Barangay Libuac here, said that he find this a destructive activity. “Even though there is no law or ordinance on this, this should be stopped or at least put some limit to their yield,” he stressed.

“Sargassum harvesters would just cut or uproot the seaweed as much as they could and don’t bother with replanting,” he added.

For those doing the harvesting, though, sargassum is a blessing.

Edgar Pigaro, also of Barangay Libuac, said he can gather up to 200 kilos a day. After three days of drying, he then sells it to local buyers in the city.

“At least we can use the money to buy rice and other needs,” he said.



NorthCot gov asks military to intervene in MILF-MNLF row
Read 385 times | Posted on May 31, 2013 @ 6 years ago

By Keith Bacongco

CARMEN, North Cotabato (MindaNews / 29 May) – North Cotabato Governor Emmylou Taliño-Mendoza has asked the military on Wednesday to intervene in the row between the Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF) and the Moro National Liberation Front (MNLF) in the municipality of Matalam, which has already affected over a thousand families.

Mendoza told MindaNews over the phone that she endorsed the request of Senior Supt. Danilo Peralta, provincial police chief, for the Army’s 6th Infantry Division to clear the area first before the displaced villagers would return.

But she added that she received reports on the presence of armed men last Tuesday despite the memorandum of agreement signed by the warring groups last week to withdraw their forces.

Capt. Antonio Bulao, spokesperson of the Army’s 602nd Infantry Brigade, said the military has utilized all peace mechanisms to prevent the escalation of the conflict. He said they encouraged the leadership of both parties, local government officials and ceasefire committees to intervene.

The MNLF group is under Datu Dima Ambil of the MNLF Sebangan Kutawato State Revolutionary Committee while the MILF fighters are part of the 108th Base Command led by Kagui Mansor and a certain Marumsar.

But clashes escalated and displaced villagers from barangays Marbel and Ilian in Matalam, according to Bulao.

Two MILF fighters were hurt in the clash, the Army earlier reported.

The National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (NDRRMC) reported that 1,421 families from barangays Marbel, Ilian, Kilada, Kidama, Estado and Natutungan have been affected by the fighting.

On May 23, both sides signed a pact to withdraw their forces within 24 hours, Bulao disclosed.

Edris Gandalibo, appointed by Mendoza as her deputy governor for Muslims, said that part of the agreement was that MILF and MNLF members who are local residents will not have to withdraw.

“But they should not display their firearms. They are all from Barangay Marbel. They are just neighbors actually,” said Gandalibo, who was part of the negotiating team from the provincial government.

But Bulao said tension has not been defused until Tuesday because the armed men – Some 400 MILF fighters and 100 MNLF members – were still sighted in the villages.

The conflict stemmed from a land dispute between members of the MILF and the MNLF.

In February 2011, the same groups also clashed in barangays Nangaan and Simone in the neighboring municipality of Kabacan.

“What is important is that the area should be cleared of those who do not belong to that community,” Bulao said. He noted that most of the forces from both camps are not local residents.

“The area should be cleared of these armed men soonest so people’s agony won’t be prolonged, especially those who were displaced from their homes,” he added.

Gandalibo said that government soldiers are deployed as “peacekeeping force” to allow the return of the displaced villagers. (Keith Bacongco / Mindanews)



South Cotabato warns folks of possible landslides, flashfloods
Read 379 times | Posted on May 31, 2013 @ 6 years ago

By Allen V. Estabillo

GENERAL SANTOS CITY (MindaNews ) – The provincial government of South Cotabato alerted local disaster management teams against the possible occurrence of landslides and flashfloods in identified critical areas with the onset of the rainy season.

Lawyer Hilario de Pedro III, South Cotabato provincial administrator, said Wednesday they are closely monitoring several local communities, especially those located near river-tributaries and landslide-prone areas, due to the erratic weather condition.

He said sporadic heavy rains affecting most parts of the province in the last several days could trigger landslides in some upland areas as well as floods in the lowlands.

“Since the rainy season has already started, everybody should be vigilant and take the necessary precaution to be better prepared in case disasters will occur,” he said in an interview over Radio Mindanao Network.

De Pedro, who heads the Provincial Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Office (PDRRMO), noted that most upland areas in the province are considered critical to landslides due to the quality and type of soil found in the area.

He said the province’s ground soil is mainly volcanic or made up of pyroclastic materials that were traced from previous explosions of the area’s two active volcanoes – Mt. Matutum in Polomolok and Tupi towns and Mt. Melebingoy (formerly Parker) in T’boli town.

Major landslides were recorded in the last two years in upland portions of Tampakan, T’boli and Lake Sebu towns as well as in Koronadal City.

The Mines and Geosciences Bureau (MGB) of Region 12 had cited topography and the overly saturated ground soil as the main causes of the previous landslides in these areas.

In T’boli and Tampakan towns, the risk of the possible occurrence of major landslides was compounded by the small-scale mining activities.

In terms of flashfloods, among the areas being watched by the PDRRMO are communities near major rivers in Koronadal City and the municipalities of Banga, Norala, Tupi, Polomolok, Surallah, Sto. Niño, T’boli and Lake Sebu.

Meantime, De Pedro said they are closely coordinating with the Department of Education (DepEd) for the implementation of disaster mitigation measures for schools within the province that are located in flood and landslide-prone areas.

He said they initially directed DepEd and local school administrators to clean up the waterways within the vicinity of school compounds or campuses to prevent possible flooding in case heavy rains will occur.

He added that they have also set coordination systems between school officials and barangay-based disaster management personnel as part of its disaster mitigation program.



N. Mindanao fast becoming a huge transshipment hub, trade center – RDC-X
Read 581 times | Posted on May 31, 2013 @ 6 years ago

By Apipa P. Bagumbaran

CAGAYAN DE ORO CITY (PIA) — Iligan City Mayor Lawrence Ll. Cruz, chairperson of the Regional Development Council of Northern Mindanao (RDC-X), spelled out the major accomplishments of the Council in the past three years in his State of the Region Address (SORA) which he delivered during the 97th RDC-X meeting held Iligan City on Tuesday, May 28.

He said that the region’s quest to present Northern Mindanao as the most competitive, efficient and attractive transshipment hub and the leading industrial core and trade center in Southern Philippines is now fast becoming a reality.

According to him, various infrastructure projects have been implemented including the improvement of the region’s road networks and seaports.

He said the RDC has created the Special Committee on the Laguindingan Airport Development Project that fast-tracked the formulation of immediate actions on issues and concerns pertinent to the operation of the much-awaited international standard Laguindingan Airport.

RDC-X was also instrumental in bringing back the survivorship benefits removed in August 2009 for gainfully employed surviving spouses of GSIS members, Cruz added.

Moreover, the Council endorsed the following proposals for inclusion in the Regional Development Investment Program 2011-2016: Road Development Projects in Ozamiz City; Iligan Coastal By-Pass Road Project; Iligan Tourism Triangle Development Master Plan; Gilligan-Bukidnon Agribusiness and Ecotourism Growth Corridor Master Plan; and eFlood Control Development Master Plan for Mandulog and ligan Rivers and the Conduct of a Feasibility Study for a Sabo Dam Project in Iligan City.

The Council further supported the request for the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (NDRRMC) through the Regional DRRMC to retain the budget for Iligan City recovery and rehabilitation after 2013 until all the projects in the P12 billion plus Calamity Fund have been completed.

It also expressed support to the amalgamation of the State Universities and Colleges (SUCs) in Region X; the passage of the Magna Carta for Barangay Nutrition Scholars;RA 10070 Establishing an Institutional Mechanism to Ensure the Implementation of Programs and Services for Persons with Disabilities, Amending RA 7277 known as the Magna Carta for Disabled Persons; and the revised implementing rules and regulations governing Section 18 of the Urban Development and Housing Act (UDHA) to fast-track the relocation of high-risk communitiesto safe areas.

Meanwhile, the RDC awarded Certificates of Appreciation to its officials for their exemplary leadership and Certificates of Recognition to its members for their steadfast commitment, active participation and continuing support in attaining regional development.

The said meeting was the last full council conference presided by Mayor Cruz as the RDC now prepares for its reorganization in August 2013 for the 2013-2016 term. (Peleta B. Abejo/NEDA-10/APB/PIA-10)



Mom asks PNOY to probe ‘foul play’ over OFW’s death
Read 479 times | Posted on May 31, 2013 @ 6 years ago

By CHRIS V. PANGANIBAN, Editor-at-large

SAN Francisco, Agusan del Sur––The mother of the Overseas Filipino Worker who reportedly committed suicide inside the Philippine Embassy compound in Bahrain has called on President Benigno Aquino III to order further investigation on the case as she strongly believed there was a foul play surrounding the incident.

Helena Virginia Viray, mother of the victim Kathleen Anne Ilagan , has sent a letter to Malacanang to pursue a deeper probe on the case saying she was “extremely” dissatisfied with the initial reports which ran counter to circumstances they gathered from telephone conversations with her a few days before she died.

“We believe that Kathleen did not commit suicide since there was foul play,” Viray told local mediamen during a\a press conference on Tuesday at the Philippine Information Agency Regional Office in Butuan City.

Ilagan, a mother of three children, was initially reported by Embassy officials as to have committed suicide by hanging herself at the doorknob on April 8. She used to work as pastry chef but left her job and asked for repatriation indicating personal differences with her fellow Filipino workers.

In her letter to President Aquino which she read before reporters, Viray has appealed to the President to investigate the real cause of her daughter’s death
since there were circumstances in the report which cast doubts including the absence of autopsy report from authorities in Bahrain.

Viray said it was their family who insisted to let her cadaver undergo an autopsy by a private doctor at their own expense when the body arrived in Manila after learning that the initial investigation from the Philippine Embassy in Bahrain only cited a police report.

The mother blamed a certain Paul Cruz, caretaker of run-away OFWS at the Embassy, for allegedly being behind the cover up on the real cause of Kathleen’s death.

She refuted Cruz’s claims that her daughter was in deep depression when she sought refuge at the Embassy since she was completely normal when they talked over the phone few days before she died telling her about her wish to go home at once and be with her three children.

Viray said it was only in April 7 when Kathleen started showing strange signs by just talking a little about her condition inside as if she was already in trouble. She questioned Cruz for allowing Kathleen’s employer to take her back to their workplace for a few hours without asking the purpose of the meeting.

The victim’s family has sent Kathleen P105,000 to compensate the cancellation of her unfinished work contract in response to the demand of her employer but the money was not given since she already died before she could claim it.

Several community groups of OFWs in Bahrain have earlier lambasted Ambassador Sahid Glang of the Embassy in Bahrain expressing serious doubts to the initial findings that she hanged herself at the doorknob.

“Hanging yourself at the doorknob? If you are in our shoes Ambassador Sahid Glang, would you also believe that she really hanged herself at the doorknob?” said a statement from the Facebook account “Justice for Kathleen Anne” created by OFWs in Bahrain.

Viray had earlier revealed in an interview with Bahrain-based paper Daily Tribune that her daughter had confided to her in a phone conversation in the first week of April that her room provided by her employer was ransacked by unknown people with her things in total mess but the door lock was not damaged.

Migrante-Middle East has also called for an independent probe over her death citing mysterious circumstances that surround before her death. John Leonard Monterno, Migrante-Middle East Coordinator, said Kathleen Anne’s death was “puzzling.”



Globe Community takes on the power of digital media for customer service
Read 360 times | Posted on May 31, 2013 @ 6 years ago

Globe Community, the pioneering online community of Globe Telecom reaches several milestones three months after its initial debut in cyberspace.

A first in the Philippines, Globe Community (community.globe.com.ph) allows Globe subscribers or potential customers interact, discuss, and resolve Globe-related concerns and topics on the digital space. Globe Community has over 3,000 members after barely three months of opening to the public.

The site enables customers to help other customers with knowledge and insights on everything Globe. It attracts an average of over 860 unique visitors and over 3,300 page views per day or over 25,000 unique visitors and over 99,000 page views per month. It has close to 4,000 responses from more than 642 different topics with over 1,400 ‘thumbs up’ given to different users with helpful answers.

According to Globe Customer Experience Head Chris Lipman, the community portal has been making an impact with customers as more and more are turning to Globe Community for answers to product, promo, or customer service questions. “Considering these are customers helping other customers, the fastest time a concern has been answered is under two hours. We already have accepted solutions to queries posted in the Community. With this, customers no longer have to go to a Globe Store or call the hotline to have their concerns answered. Globe Community is accessible via internet anywhere anytime of the day.”

“With more people turning to online channels and social media to get feedback on Globe-related issues, we put up the Globe Community to find solutions and answers to commonly-asked questions quicker and easier, as well as to forge interaction among Globe and non-Globe subscribers for knowledge-sharing and community-building purposes. Globe Community is now starting to offer Globe Community exclusives, or special deals offered to Community members only. We are also launching Interest Groups where members can talk about their hobbies like travel, food, photography, etc.,” Lipman added.

Posts in the Globe Community are user-generated content such as tips and tricks, concerns that other customers can help resolve, tutorials, step-by-step guides, infographics, videos, as well as new ideas to better use Globe services and promos. To maintain a healthy discussion of topics, all comments submitted via the Globe Community website are reviewed by a moderator.

To register to Globe Community, a user can go to community.globe.com.ph, click on either the ‘Register’ or ‘Connect to Facebook’ from the top-right section of the website. Once registered, simply click on ‘Join the Conversation’ to login.

Globe Community is powered by Lithium Technologies Inc., the world’s leader in Social Customer Experience.

 Page 1 of 113  1  2  3  4  5 » ...  Last »