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Archive for June, 2013





Accuracy of 2013 polls: challenge to Comelec
Read 425 times | Posted on June 30, 2013 @ 6 years ago

Batas

BY : ATTY. BATAS MAURICIO

LIFE’S INSPIRATIONS: “… Speak your truth, quietly and clearly; and listen to others, even the dull and the ignorant; they too have their story…” (Max Ehrmann, American writer, in the 1927 poem, “Desiderata”).
-ooo-

ACCURACY OF 2013 POLLS IS NOT A MATTER OF RANDOM AUDIT ONLY: It is no longer amusing to see Chairman Sixto Brillantes Jr. of the Commission on Elections (Comelec) and his other commissioners endlessly insisting on the accuracy of the Automated Election System (AES) for the 2013 polls, using as their sole basis the results of the supposed random manual audit that the Commission carried out after the elections.

With due respect, it is totally wrong, legally and factually, for Brillantes and the whole Commission, to be saying that the results could be considered “accurate” based on the random manual audit alone, as if such an audit, under existing laws, is the only basis for declaring whether an election is indeed accurate or not. The random manual audit is just one tiny basis, and there are other bases which Brillantes and his commissioners are not talking about, apparently wishing to sweep those other bases under the rug.

The fact is, if the results of the 2013 elections were subjected to an audit using the requirements under the Automated Election Law and also under the E-Commerce Law of 2000, which should be the proper audit really, there could be no other conclusion but that the said election is nowhere near being accurate.
-ooo-

CHALLENGE TO BRILLANTES AND COMELEC: To prove my point, I am challenging Brillantes and the Comelec to subject the results of the 2013 election to an audit, not only under a random manual audit but also under the two laws I am mentioning here, and also particularly to the Terms of Reference which the poll body signed with Smartmatic Inc., and let’s see if they will still be insisting on the accuracy of that election.

In a petition which I filed last June 25, 2013 with the Comelec for a group of Pasay City residents seeking a declaration of failure of elections in the city on account of the massive inability of the precinct count optical scan (PCOS) machines to produce accurate tallies, this point is discussed quite thoroughly.

A portion of that petition says: “But then, really, this was not all there was to it. On top of all the foregoing, Petitioners also personally experienced and witnessed the fact that, for many voters in Pasay City, no receipts coming from the PCOS machines were issued to them by the board of election inspectors to reflect that their votes were actually counted by those machines.
-ooo-

HIDING SOMETHING, COMELEC? Another portion of that petition also said: “Petitioners also witnessed the fact that, in the transmission of the supposed results of voting and canvassing, there was even no electronic signature that would attest to the genuineness of the transmitted results. In addition, Petitioners also noted that the source code for the PCOS machines was not also made available to the interested parties for appropriate inspection and verification…”

Surely, Brillantes and his commissioners cannot deny the fact that if the foregoing requirements were not complied with, it would be totally misleading for them to be saying that the results of the 2013 election were accurate, unless of course they are merely engaged in brainwashing the Filipino electorate to make them meekly accept those results.

The silence of Brillantes and his commissioners on the compliance of the 2013 polls with these requirements, choosing instead to focus on the random manual audit alone, speaks volumes against the legitimacy of any and all of their claims about accuracy. It is as if they are trying to hide something here! The question therefore is: what are you trying to hide, Mr. Brillantes and Comelec?
-ooo-

REACTIONS? Please call me at 0917 984 24 68, 0918 574 0193, 0922 833 43 96. Email: [email protected], [email protected]



The unlocked door
Read 448 times | Posted on June 30, 2013 @ 6 years ago

Hurst

BY : JHAN TIAFAU HURST

Think a minute…This is a true story about a young lady who got so tired of living with her strict parents that she ran away from home.

But she soon found out that life was not easy on her own.

She couldn’t find a job, and it didn’t take long for her friends to get sick of her living off of their kindness so they kicked her out.

Well, this young 19-year-old girl got so desperate she decided to start making money by becoming a prostitute.

Years passed. Her father died. Her mother grew older. And the daughter’s life just got worse and terribly unhappy.

But she still would not write or go home to see her mother.

One day the mother heard that her daughter was seen in a certain part of town, so she went there looking for her daughter.

She went to every store and cheap hotel asking to put a picture on their walls.

It was a picture of herself, now a gray-haired woman.

Beside her picture was this message to her daughter which simply said: “I still love you! Please come home!”

Months went by and nothing happened.

Then one day the daughter who was now very skinny and sick wandered into one of those hotels.

You can imagine how shocked she was to see her mother’s picture on the wall of that dirty, cheap hotel.

As she read her mother’s message to her she began to cry.

That night she started walking the many miles back to her home.

It was early in the morning when she finally arrived at the front door of her parent’s house.

She began to knock but the door was already open.

Afraid that someone had broken into her parent’s house, she ran inside and woke up the sleeping old lady and told her she had finally come home.

Mother and daughter began to cry as they held each other.

The daughter said: “I thought someone had broken open the door!” But the mother shook her head and answered gently: “My dear, from the day you left I’ve kept the door unlocked.”

You know, it does not matter to Jesus Christ what wrong things you’ve done or how badly you’ve lived.

The moment you decide to turn to Him and ask His forgiveness, He will always accept you and give you another chance.

Jesus is the One Who will enable you to start a new life all over again, but this time living His way with Him in charge.

He said that’s the only way you’ll ever have real love, peace of mind, and satisfaction that lasts.

Just Think a Minute…



Oca: I’ll enforce the law no matter what!
Read 448 times | Posted on June 30, 2013 @ 6 years ago

By BONG D. FABE

MAYOR Oscar “Oca” S. Moreno yesterday vowed to do his responsibilities as “father” of Cagayan de Oro without fear or favor.

Moreno admitted in his speech after taking his oath of office before former Senate President Aquilino “Nene” Pimentel Jr. that the task of implementing his promises during the campaign is indeed “very, very difficult.”

“But we are undaunted” because of the people’s support and unity, he said.

In a short interview with The Business Daily, Moreno said he acknowledged that indeed the task is overwhelming and hard.

“But I will enforce the law, I will enforce the law, no matter what!” he vowed, explaining that the full enforcement of the law is the only way to realize his “hapsay nga panggobyerno” in the city.

He also narrated that he is so focus on making a difference in the lives of each Kagay-anons in the next three years that he is not concern if he will not be able to run or will not be elected for another term in 2016.

“I am not concerned with that [2016 election]. I am focus on the next three years. Let them think of the next election. But for me, allow me to do a difference in the city during my three years at City Hall,” he told this reporter.

“Kung gusto ko lang politika ang mangibabaw, all that I need is serve the few [who might be run over by the full enforcement of the law] even at the expense of the general welfare of our people. But I will not do that!” he stressed in his speech following his oath-taking at the Kiosko Kagawasan Sunday morning.

“My task that the people of Cagayan de Oro have given me, the task that my family expects from me is to serve the people to the best of my ability,” he added.

Moreno said that enforcing the law according to its spirit and letter will be the biggest battle he will be waging in the city. But that is the only way he and his administration will be able to realize every Kagay-anon’s dream of a city that is clean, green and economically developed where justice and peace reign.

“I know that if we enforce the law, according to its spirit, according to its letter, marami po ang masasaktan. Isa po ito sa mga realizations that I saw during the campaign…[But] for me to be able to deliver the many expectations of our people, for me to be able to achieve a bright tomorrow, para dili makawang ang pagpanganti ni Archbishop Ledesma, dili makawang ang damgo sa tanan, kinahanglan dili ako mangandoy nga mare-elect pa in 2016. My task should be to serve the people, the people of Cagayan de Oro the best way possible,” he said.
Liberation of CDO

Together with Rep. Rolando “Klarex” Uy (1st District, LP), Rep. Rufus Rodriguez (2nd District, CDP), Rep. Maximo Rodriguez Jr. (ABAMIN partylist), and Sen. Aquilino Martin “Koko” Pimentel III, with the “Team Oca” at the City Council, a “new day” has dawn in Cagayan de Oro, said Sen. Nene Pimentel.

The elder Pimentel said he is very happy to be given the chance to attend and administer the oath of office of the city’s new officials—the people who will liberate the city.

“Nalipay ako nga nakatambong niining liberasyon sa Cagayan de Oro. Sila ang magdala sa kabag-ohan sa dinhi sa atong dakbayan,” he said.

Pimentel, however, cautioned the people from expecting too much to early of the Moreno administration. He said the change that the people chose during the election last May will only happen if the voters themselves do their part.

“Ayaw isipa nga ang pagbag-o sa atong katilingban makuha ugma dayon. Medyo dugay dugay pa kana. Dako kayo ang role sa katawhan — bantayan ang inyong mga opisyal aron dili sila mahisalaag gikan sa hapsay nga dalan,” he said.

Pimentel stressed that it is the right of the people to watch government and be mindful of what their officials are doing.
Solid and United

“Panahon na karon sa pagtrabaho,” Pimentel III said as he urged Kagay-anons to work together with their city officials for the good of every Kagay-anon.

The younger Pimentel said that the long-held dream of a solid and united Cagayan de Oro is now a reality and that the joint oath-taking and inauguration was just one evidences of that unity.

With a united officials, it will be easy to plan and coordinate policies, programs and projects to make their dream of what Cagayan de Oro should be — the model city in the entire Philippines, he said.

“Tabangan nato ang atong mayor aron matuman kini,” he urged the people.
Heed the poor

Rep. Rufus Rodriguez reminded everyone of the significance of the Eucharistic Celebration officiated by Archbishop Antonio Ledesma to begin the oath-taking ceremony.

“We started our term, we started our day with a Mass. This only shows that we are going to follow what Pope Francis said that we, as part of the Church, are to build a Church for the poor, and a poor church.”

Rodriguez also reminded the other officials of the 8-point agenda which Ledesma had earlier reminded Moreno about: (1) water system improvements; (2) health program for the poor; (3) increased budget allotment for the city hospital; (4) city peace and order); (5) environmental preservation and cleanliness; (6) enforcement of traffic rules and regulations; (7) transparency of city hall; and (8) balanced integrated urban-rural development.

“The main mission of the Catholic Church is to heed the call of the poor and marginalized,” he said, quoting Blessed Pope John Paul II, as he explained that for the past six years as congressman, this has become his personal guidepost and he want other city officials to do the same.

“For the past six years since becoming congressman, I always use this as my guide. And I use HEED to help me in my programs for the poor. HEED is for Health, Education, Environment/Employment, and Development and Infrastructure.”
Strength and inspiration

Rep. Klarex Uy said serving the people through whatever programs, ways and methods has become easier with Moreno at City Hall.

“It is now easier because of a working mayor who has proven himself as governor of Misamis Oriental,” he said.

Uy urged his fellows officials to use the overwhelming support of the people—their trust and confidence—to be their “strength and inspiration” to do bigger things for the city and its people.
Wisdom of Solomon

Uy said that while the task is indeed difficult, it will become easier with the continuous support of the people.

But Archbishop Ledesma said that only if the city officials internalize the prayer of King Solomon—who asked for wisdom instead of wealth when he was crowned King of Isreal—will they be able to safety navigate the treacherous waters of government service and bring the city and its people to secure and safe shores.



‘Day One begins for new execs’
Read 378 times | Posted on June 30, 2013 @ 6 years ago

By REMEE MONQIUE O. ESPIRITU, Reporter

TODAY is Day 1 for newly-elected officials throughout the country after their formal assumption to office yesterday, June 30.

In Cagayan de Oro City, there’s not much funfare aside from the ceremonial oath taking ceremony of the city’s new chief executive, Mayor Oscar S. Moreno, Rep. Rufus Rodriguez (first district), Rep. Rolando Uy (second district), Abamin Party-list Maximo Rodriguez, and members of the city council under Team Oca.

Former senate President Aquilino Pimenter, Jr. flew in to administer the oath of office of the newly-elected officials at the Kiosko ng Kagawasan, Divisoria Plaza.

His son and namesake, Aquilino “Koko” Pimentel III also took his oath as a re-elected senator before Mayor Moreno.

The young Pimentel thanked his supporters and vowed to help make the city the model modern city in the country now that local leaders are united.

Moreno has vowed to work hard, not for purposes of reelection, but for the best government service.

The elder Pimentel, who is considered one of Cagayan de Oro’s greatest so for his exploits in the senate having authored significant laws of national scope, noted among them is the Local Government Code of the Philippines, has urged the newly-inducted officials to start buckling down to work and set aside political differences for the good of the city.

He also enjoined everyone to extend prayers for former congressman Benjo Benaldo who is currently recuperating from a self-inflicted gunshot wound. He reportedly shot himself inside his office at the House of the Representatives last week.



PH’s largest solar power plant to rise in Cotabato
Read 428 times | Posted on June 30, 2013 @ 6 years ago

By BONG S. SARMIENTO, MindaNews

KORONADAL City — Construction of the largest solar power plant in the country estimated to cost P1 billion is scheduled to start in September and expected to go on stream by January 2014, an official said Friday.

The renewable energy project will be located in a 20-hectare property in Surallah town in South Cotabato, said lawyer Antonio Bendita, the incoming town mayor.

“This will be a big boost to our town through the employment and revenue that the project will generate,” he said in a radio interview.

Bendita said the solar power facility will rise along the road in Barangay Tubi-allah, adding they expect it to become an ecotourism attraction of the locality.

The facility will produce power for the South Cotabato I Electric Cooperative, Inc. (Socoteco I), he said.

The supply contract has been signed last Wednesday between Socoteco I and NV Vogt Philippines Solar Energy One, Inc., Bendita added.

At five MW, it would be the biggest photovoltaic (PV) power project in the country once completed, surpassing the one-megawatt solar facility in Cagayan de Oro City.

Socoteco I, which serves this city, the seat of government of Region 12, eight other towns in South Cotabato and Lutayan in Sultan Kudarat, has a daily peak power demand of 32 MW.

Santiago Tudio, Socoteco I general manager, said their contract with the National Power Corp. (Napocor) is ending this August, and the cooperative has been looking for suppliers as the state-owned power company reportedly indicated it would no longer renew its 20-MW allocation to the cooperative.

Napocor operates the Agus and Pulangi hydropower plants, which supply half of Mindanao’s power needs.

Tudio said earlier they are working for the acquisition of diesel-fired modular generator sets that could produce 15 MW to offset the projected supply shortfall with the end of the three-year contract with Napocor in August.

Napocor started reducing its allocation to electric cooperatives in Mindanao last year due to the declining capacity of its hydropower plants in Bukidnon and Lanao del Norte.

Daily rotating brownout lasting up to eight hours hit some parts of the island months ago and the interruptions are expected to be back in August to December due to the scheduled preventive maintenance shutdowns of power plants.

As alternative solution to the Mindanao problem, the Department of Energy has offered a loan scheme that will allow electric cooperatives in Mindanao to acquire their own modular generator sets.

Under the scheme, which will be coursed through National Electrification Administration, Energy Secretary Carlos Jericho Petilla said electric cooperatives will be given a grace period of two years wherein they will only be required to pay for the loan’s interest.

After two years, he said the cooperatives will have an option to pay for the loan principal and interest or completely waive any further payment by returning the generator sets to NEA.



Charter Change to liberalize foreign investments pushed
Read 330 times | Posted on June 30, 2013 @ 6 years ago

By James Hookway, The Wall Street Journal

THE Philippines is growing faster than China, but some Filipinos feel it could do even better and are urging Philippine President Benigno Aquino III to redraft the protectionist constitution enacted on his mother’s watch in the 1980s.

The country has won new fans among global investors this year, shaking off its old reputation as one of Asia’s perennial laggards. Government data set first-quarter growth at 7.8% from a year earlier, above China’s 7.7% growth in the period. Some research firms have pegged the growth rate even higher using other measures: According to Credit Suisse’s calculations, the country’s economy expanded by an annualized 9.1% in the first quarter.

In March, the Philippines secured a coveted investment-grade credit rating from Fitch.

But unemployment is still high – at 7.5% in April – and many Filipinos see a window to encourage more foreign investment to extend the country’s sudden growth spurt.

They want to see the Philippines drop decades-old rules that limit foreign shareholders from owning more than 40% in utility and mining business and bar them entirely in other sectors, notably media and education. They also want to let overseas investors own or extend the leases on land on which they build their factories.

A growing swell of lawmakers, businesses and economists now say shaking up the constitution could lure global manufacturers to the Philippines and help it catch up with the likes of Vietnam, which last year attracted over $10 billion in foreign direct investment compared with the Philippines’ tally of $2 billion.

“Now is the time to change,” said Bernardo Villegas, an economist and senior vice president at the University of Asia and the Pacific in Manila. “Think of how much more we could achieve if we allow more foreign investment to help us.”

Streamlining the constitution – what Filipinos call “cha-cha,” or charter change – is a difficult dance, however.

The document has a status almost approaching that of a sacred text. It was developed under the watch during the presidency of Mr. Aquino’s mother, President Corazon Aquino, following the 1986 “People Power” revolt that drove late dictator Ferdinand Marcos from power. Among other things, it limits presidents to a single, six-year term and has sweeping investment safeguards designed to ensure the primacy of Filipino investors and prevent the country’s resources ever being bundled off to foreign powers.

Several leaders have attempted and failed to revise the constitution. Some changed course after facing noisy street protests accusing them of attempting to turn back the Philippines’ political clock and extend their terms in office.

The 53-year-old Mr. Aquino might have better prospects initiating a change – assuming he is interested. He reluctantly ran for president in 2010 after a public clamor following his mother’s death the year before; many people who know him suggest he is counting the days until he can leave the hot seat.

Mr. Aquino has repeatedly said he isn’t interested in rewriting the constitution. He prefers to focus instead on cleaning up the country’s reputation for corruption and make its government more efficient – a policy that his supporters have dubbed “Aquinomics” and which has impressed economists with its impact.

Moody’s Analytics economist Glenn Levin recently predicted that the Philippines’ economy could expand by 7% in both 2013 and 2014 amid a consumer boom fueled by growing remittances from the country’s overseas workforce and its rising outsourcing industry.

Some of Mr. Aquino’s closest allies, however, contend that cleaning up government alone isn’t enough to provide the long-term economic boost that the Philippines needs to put a dent in the gut-wrenching poverty that still blights many of its 100 million people. By government measures, some 30% of the country’s population live below the poverty line.

House Speaker Feliciano Belmonte hopes to change Mr. Aquino’s mind before the president’s term expires in 2016. He is pushing Congress to add exceptions to the constitution to encourage more foreign investment, while several prominent senators have also voiced their support for more limited proposals that stop short of providing investors more access to land but which allow them to enter a broader range of businesses. (Dow Jones)



EU renews support to PHL’s global trade
Read 309 times | Posted on June 30, 2013 @ 6 years ago

MAKATI CITY—The Philippine Government and the European Union (EU) officially launched at the weekend the 3rd phase of the EU-supported Trade Related Technical Assistance Project (TRTA 3), which aims to promote trade and investments in the Philippines as drivers of economic growth, job creation, and poverty reduction.

TRTA 3 provides for a P453-million fund for the expansion of the Philippines’ trade with the rest of the world and to attract more local and foreign investments.

It will also enhance the government’s capacity to implement some of the key policies and technical priorities identified in the Philippine Development Plan 2012-2016 such as support policy and regulatory reforms to strengthen the industry and promote genuine competition.

As head of the Department in charge of the implementation of the programme, Secretary Gregory L. Domingo expressed the belief that TRTA 3 will “pave the way for more economic breakthroughs for the Philippines and strengthen cooperation between our country and the EU.”

Stressing that economic reforms are a long-term undertaking, EU Ambassador Guy Ledoux emphasized the European Union’s commitment to help the country undertake the “necessary steps to see a Philippine economy that creates jobs and take the country further on a sustainable growth path.”

The EU-Philippine trade cooperation started in 2005, through which the EU helped provide access of Philippine fishery exports to the EU market of about 500 million consumers.

TRTA 3 builds upon the successes of the first two phases of the TRTA, which contributed to the rise of the Philippines’ ranking from 68th to 61st in the “trading across border” index of the World Bank “Business Report.” This achievement was particularly attributed to the introduction of electronic systems for the submission of customs declarations and online payments.

It is hoped that TRTA 3 will also contribute to the consolidation and establishment of new systems to reduce costs and delays of engaging in trade as well as strengthen food safety measures and control systems for local products to gain access to international markets, aside from providing on-demand services to public sector and business associations to address their urgent needs.

The work plan that will operationalize TRTA3 was developed by government agencies with collaboration from the business sector, academe and civil society. (DTI/PIA)



Inefficient infra deters Mindanao’s growth
Read 401 times | Posted on June 30, 2013 @ 6 years ago

THE government must continue to address nagging issues in Mindanao to spur its economic growth as the March upgrade by international credit rating agency Fitch Ratings will not be enough to generate investments in the region.

Professor Benjamin Diokno of the University of the Philippines said the Fitch Rating upgrade does not necessarily translate to the influx of investors in Mindanao, where many issues need to be addressed.

“Overall, the upgrade is a necessary but not sufficient condition for higher private investment. Much remains to be done by the government,” he said in a statement.

Diokno, an economist and former budget secretary, stressed that government must provide better public infrastructure, reduce the cost of doing business, improve its revenue generating capacity, ensure policy consistency, and relax some restrictive provisions in the Constitution, among others.

“Mindanao as an investment destination has added wrinkles. Power supply adequacy and reliability and peace and order problems are quite severe,” he said.

He also urged the government to look into Mindanao’s “inefficient sea and air transport system.”

“Sadly these problems cannot be solved overnight. But they should be addressed with great sense of urgency,” he said. (MB)



Election-related spending spurs Jollibee’s growth
Read 325 times | Posted on June 30, 2013 @ 6 years ago

STRONG consumer spending in the Philippines and China, as well as new product offerings, will lift earnings of Jollibee Foods Corp (JFC) this year, as the homegrown fast-food giant expands its global footprint.

On the sidelines of the company’s stockholders meeting today, JFC chief financial officer Ysmael Baysa told reporters that the firm “grew very well” in the second quarter of the year.

It posted a 33 percent increase in net attributable income to P895 million in the first quarter from P672 million in the same period in 2012.

“There are two drivers: one is better products and the other one is election spending. Normally, election spending has an effect in the second quarter,” Baysa said.

While election spending will have less effect in the second half, new offerings will support the company’s growth, he added.

JFC aims to grow its earnings per share by at least 12 percent. To to do this, same-store sales must grow by at least five percent, Baysa said.

The weakness of the peso is both positive and negative on JFC, as it imports a fifth of its raw materials.

“From different angles, it can be good also if the OFW family income will be a little bit higher,” JFC chairman Tony Tan Caktiong said.

JFC continues to build the presence of its existing brands in China despite concerns of a slowdown in the world’s second biggest economy. With 400 stores in China, its store network is expected to hit 500 next year across the Yonghe King, Hong Zhuang Yuan and San Pin Wang brands.

“In fact, one of the reasons why profit in the first quarter rose 33 percent, a big part of the improvement came from improvement in China. Improvement in China profitability is continuing,” Baysa said.

Jollibee hopes to penetrate the “difficult” markets of Indonesia and India someday.

“We are still on the lookout how we can expand into Indo and India. In Myanmar, we haven’t started looking yet but lots of interested parties are convincing us to go into Myanmar,” Tan Caktiong said.

Jollibee entered the Singapore market early this year and was well-received by the Filipino population. In the first few weeks, Filipinos flocked to store and it took 2-3 hours before a customer can come inside. However, waiting time has been reduced to 30 minutes now and Singaporean visitors have also increased, Tan Caktiong said.

Despite the group’s expansion overseas, Philippine operations still account for 80 percent of its businesses.

“While the business abroad is growing well, the Philippines is also growing well,” Baysa said.

JFC is not eyeing any acquisition but it remains on the lookout for opportunities, especially fast-food chains offering similar products that have strong brand names in the local market, Tan Caktiong said.

JFC set aside a capital expenditure budget of P5.5 billion for the year, 73 percent of which will be earmarked for investments in new stores and renovations of existing ones.

JFC operates the largest food service network in the Philippines with 2,652 stores at end-March. It had a network of 2,090 stores in the country comprising the flagship Jollibee, Chowking, Greenwich, Red Ribbon, Mang Inasal and Burger King. It had 562 stores abroad, including Yonghe King, Hong Zhuang Yuan, San Pin Wang and Chow Fun.

JFC has a 50 percent interest in joint ventures for Highlands Coffee (Vietnam, Philippines) at 71, Pho 24 (Vietnam, Indonesia, Philippines, Japan) at 65 and Sabu (China) at three.



Globe says bandwidth gets boost sub cable
Read 387 times | Posted on June 30, 2013 @ 6 years ago

GLOBE Telecom on Friday said the submarine Southeast Asia-Japan Cable (SJC) is now fully operational, allowing subscribers to enjoy higher bandwidth.

“The additional capacity generated by the SJC system is highly cost effective, allowing greater route flexibility, and enabling Globe Telecom to provide businesses and consumers future support for bandwidth-hungry applications, consistent with the explosion of mobile Internet and IT enabled services,” Ernest Cu, Globe president said in a statement.

Globe is part of the consortium of companies that laid down the submarine cable.

According to Cu, the undersea cable also provides resilient connectivity to other submarine cables, which will enhance the company’s global link.

“The cable system is expected to further enrich the way the Asia Pacific region, including the Philippines, interacts and communicates with the rest of the world,” he said.

The 8,900-kilometer undersea cable links seven countries and territories, including Brunei, mainland China, Hong Kong, Japan, Singapore and the Philippines, including an option to link with Thailand.

Costing $400 million, the SJC consists of six fiber pairs with the initial design capacity of 28 terabits per second, the fastest speed an undersea cabling system can provide, to meet bandwidth-intensive applications such as internet TV, online games and enterprise data exchange.

Aside from the SJC, Globe also is connected to the East Asia Cable, Asia Pacific Cable Network, Tata Global Network–Intra Asia cable, the City to City cable system and the Trans-Pacific Cable system, which encompasses the Unity, Tata Global Network-Pacific, Japan-US Cable Network and the US Domestic Access cable systems.

Besides Globe, other members of the SJC consortium are Brunei International Gateway Sendirian Berhad (BIG), China Mobile International Ltd (CMI), China Telecommunications Corp (China Telecom), China Telecom Global Ltd (CTG, an affiliate of China Telecommunications Corp), Donghwa Telecom Co Ltd (a subsidiary of Chunghwa Telecom Co Ltd), Google SJC Bermuda Ltd (a subsidiary of Google Inc), KDDI Corp, Singapore Telecommunications Ltd, PT Telekomunikasi Indonesia International (Telin a subsidiary of PT. Telekomunikasi Indonesia, Tbk), and TOT Public Co Ltd.

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