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‘ZA-4MDND-HEADLINES’ Archives



Del Rosario retains post in LPP
Read 404 times | Posted on July 26, 2013 @ 5 years ago

By Noel Baguio, Contributor

GOVERNOR Rodolfo del Rosario of Davao del Norte will continues to serve as a member of the National Executive Board (NEB) of the League of Provinces of the Philippines (LPP) after retaining his post as chair of the league for Davao region.

Del Rosario, who was a former LPP president, got his third nomination as NEB member during the League’s general assembly and election last July 19, 2013 in Manila.

The governor took his oath before Interior and Local Government Secretary Mar Roxas, along with the other winning officials of the League, led by reelected LPP President Gov. Alfonso Umali Jr. of Oriental Mindoro.

On his second term in 2001, Del Rosario was elected by his peers as president of the LPP and, subsequently, the powerful Union of Local Authorities of the Philippines (ULAP).

Among his accomplishments as LPP president then was the monetization of the internal revenue allotment (IRA) share of LGUs to augment limited local resources.

The LPP primarily aims to ventilate, articulate, and crystallize issues affecting provincial and metropolitan government administrations. It specifically seeks to foster unity and cooperation among all provinces of the country, among other objectives.

Del Rosario also sits as concurrent chair of the Regional Peace and Order Council (RPOC)-XI and the Confederation of all the Local Chief Executives in Mindanao (Confed).



City council urged to walk the talk for watershed preservation
Read 304 times | Posted on July 26, 2013 @ 5 years ago

By JOHN RIZLE L. SALIGUMBA of DavaoToday.com

DAVAO City––The city council is planning to revive its earlier resolution to ban mining in the city after reports that a mining firm has secured a permit in Paquibato District.

During the council’s session Tuesday, second district Councilor Danilo Dayanghirang said he received a letter from a farmers group saying that MRC Allied Inc., has secured a permit on an 8,475 hectares mining application in the area.

The letter, written by the Paquibato District Peasant Association (PADIPA) said the mining exploration will destroy the city’s watershed area.

Members of PADIPA staged a camp in front of the SP building to signify their protest to the mining firm and harassments by the Investment Defense Force of the Armed Forces of the Philippines.

The MRC Allied, Inc. (MRC), has listed Davao in one of its projects aside from others projects in Tampakan, Surigao, Boston-Cateel and New Cebu Township One (NCTO). According to the environment group Panalipdan Southern Mindanao, the firm is owned by business tycoon Lucio Tan.

Dayanghirang said the city has the right to know how and where the mining company secured permit.

The legislator said he personally checked MGB on the existence of such a permit. “I have talked to Mr. Angeles (OIC of MGB 11), and he informed me there was no such favorable endorsement but, indeed, there is an application for exploration permits of Alberto Mining Corporation and Penson’s Mining Corporation since 2011.

First District Councilor Melchor Quitain said he consulted with IP Mandatory Representative Mambo-o who told him the application was already disapproved and that the NCIP should be consulted.

Councilor Diosdao Mahipus said that Davao City should “walk the talk” in standing against mining.

Mahipus said certain mining companies have applied permits in Manila, and “already started talking to the tribes or the indigenous peoples’ community in Paquibato,” he said declining to name the company but admitting to having talked with their lawyer.

“If we really want to protect the environment of Davao City, then mining should be farthest from our mind. We do not only talk about it, we should walk the talk,” Mahipus said.

Dayanghirang urged the council to firm up its resolution on mining, recalling that last year a committee hearingconducted by Advincula tackled the resolution item number 1247, “Resolution Probiting Mining and Declaring Davao City as Mining-Free City, specifically open-pit and underground mining.”

A review of the council’s official record showed it only passed first reading.

Dayanghirang was wary though that Aquino’s Executive Order 79 gives the President the authority to permit mining operations even without the approval of local leaders. Aquino has used this order to override the South Cotabato LGU’s ban on open pit mining.

The EO, signed in 2012, identifies areas for large-scale and small-scale mining, and revenue sharing. The order suspends the application of new mining permits, but allows DENR & MGB to issue permits to explore.

Mahipus was concerned that when the national government approves such mining operation in Paquibato, the local government will be the “whipping boy” of these mining companies.

In an interview with davaotoday, Panalipdan Spokesperson Juland Suazo said that it is not too late for the Council to pass the resolution.

“Although the LGU has the right to veto, it has lost such right because of EO 79 of President Aquino. But, it is still appropriate and timely for the Council to pass such a resolution to register that it has a firm stand against mining,” said Suazo. (John Rizle L. Saligumba/ Reposted by (http://bulatlat.com)



Second startup weekend in Davao
Read 408 times | Posted on July 26, 2013 @ 5 years ago

By Florienne Melendrez
of MindaNews

DAVAO City––People with business ideas to share may enlist for the second holding of Startup Weekend Davao, which is scheduled on August 9 to 11.

Angel Abella, one of the event organizers, said during the Club 888 press conference at Marco Polo Davao Wednesday that Startup Weekend is a “global grassroots movement of active and empowered entrepreneurs who are learning the basics of founding startups and launching successful ventures”.

The event originated in Seattle, Washington in 2007.

She said they have invited chief executive officers and chief product officers from IT companies in Cebu and Manila to serve as mentors and judges for the event.

Although the usual participants are businessmen, software developers, web designers, marketers, product managers and startup enthusiasts, everyone is still welcome to participate.

“Even if you’re a student, you can join as long as you have ideas to share and passionate enough to start up a business,” said Bert Barriga, executive vice president of ICT Davao.

Last year, the event drew 110 participants who came up with 14 startup ideas.

During the event, there will be a “pitch fire” where participants will be given 60 seconds to pitch an idea for business. The ideas will then be voted on and teams will be formed to develop the top chosen ideas.

Dulce Rose Lada, head organizer of the event, said that this is an avenue to develop skills and easily start up business.

She also mentioned that the winning team last year will be going to Silicon Valley to propose another product later this year.

The event will be held at Centron Building, Quirino Avenue. Applicants may register at http://davao.startupweekend.org for a fee of P1000.



Consumer rights advocacy fortified
Read 317 times | Posted on July 26, 2013 @ 5 years ago

TAGUM City, Davao del Norte––The Department of Trade and Industry-Davao del Norte provincial office (DTI-DN) is now utilizing the schools to advance its advocacy and awareness on consumer rights and protection.

During the just-held Kadagayaan Festival, the DTI turned over to the Department of Education (DepEd) through Governor Rodolfo del Rosario the consumer rights and responsibilities advocacy posters.

DTI-DN Provincial Director Engr. Edwin O. Banquerigo said the project, which is a component of his office’s “Ramdam Ka Ba Ni Juan Project”, aims to increase the awareness of schoolchildren about their rights and responsibilities as consumers.

“We want to have the Consumer Rights and Responsibilities Advocacy Posters in every classroom in the province of Davao del Norte because we believe that the students, especially those who are still in elementary, are one of the best vehicles for consumer advocacy,” he said.

Moreover, Banquerigo said such strategy is to enhance the level of consumer awareness and for everyone to feel the presence of DTI services. We intend to start this campaign at the grade level.

“Teaching them when they are still young is most effective in moulding someone’s mindset,” he said.

By employing the public-private partnership (PPP) mechanism, DTI-DN was able to get the support and commitment of NCCC Supermarket and NCCC Department Store wherein the said home-grown chain of stores participated by sponsoring the printing of 450 Tarpaulin Posters.

The advocacy posters were given to Emilyn Saladores of DepEd-Davao del Norte, Darwin Suyat of DepEd-Tagum City, and Elsa S. Liyag of DepEd-Island Garden City of Samal.



Dads approve new liquor ban
Read 328 times | Posted on July 26, 2013 @ 5 years ago

By CHERYLL D. FIEL
of DavaoToday

DAVAO City––In a span of less than two weeks, the City council introduced, deliberated and approved a new liquor ban that prohibits business establishments from selling and serving liquors and other intoxicating substances starting at one in the morning.

“This is what the mayor wanted. He wanted to expedite its approval for him to address the issue on maintaining peace and order,” councilor Bonifacio Militar, proponent of the ordinance said in an interview with the media, minutes after a special session Wednesday, hammered the new law.

Militar said Mayor Rodrigo Duterte has frequently dealt with minors involved in such crimes that usually occur after midnight, hence he wrote the City Council last week on July 15 deeming the amendment to the liquor ban as urgent.

The council immediately passed the amendments on July 16 on its first reading. A week later, the council passed the ordinance, but it took a special session Wednesday as they ran out of time during their regular session on Tuesday.

Militar said, in all his 19 years in the council, this is the first time that an ordinance has been passed this fast in just a week’s time.

Militar clarified that due process was observed in the passage of the law which was expedited due to the mayor’s request. Even the Davao City Chamber of Commerce and Industry (DCCI) manifested their support of the ordinance, he added.

If the Vice Mayor Paolo Duterte signs it today, the ordinance will be submitted to the Office of the City Mayor for approval. The ordinance shall immediately take effect three
days posting in a publication for three consecutive times.

The ordinance seeks an earlier curfew of one in the morning for the selling, serving and consumption of liquors, coco wine and other nature wine and other alcoholic beverages, instead of two in the morning, stated in the previous liquor ban ordinance of 1994.

The ordinance also prohibits the consumption of intoxicating substances within business establishments and in other public places within curfew hours. These include, but are not limited to parks, plazas, parking areas, and uninhabited private places.

The amendment also exacts higher penalties for violators, such as a fine of P3,000 for first-time offenders; P5,000 fine and three-month imprisonment or both upon discretion of the court for second-time offenders; and a P5,000 fine, with imprisonment of one year upon determination of the court and revocation of business permit for third-time offenders.

Militar clarified that the ordinance is both administrative and criminal in nature. No person, he added, shall, however, be apprehended in violation of the ordinance, if no case has been filed in court.

The amendment also provides a clause on the handling of minors caught violating the law, where they shall be dealt with in accordance with the juvenile justice law.

Under the law Republic Act 9344 or the Juvenile Justice Welfare Act of 2007, a child 15 years of age or under at the time of the commission of the offense shall be exempt from criminal liability but will be subjected to an intervention program.

A child above 15 years but below 18 years, under the law shall also be exempted from criminal liability, unless he has acted with discernment, in which case he shall be subjected to appropriate proceedings.

There is, however, a pending proposal in Congress to amend the law wherein children, 12 to 15 years old who are proven to have committed a crime may now face imprisonment of not lower than one year. (Cheryll D. Fiel/davaotoday.com)



Gensan wants renewable energy investments
Read 376 times | Posted on July 26, 2013 @ 5 years ago

GENERAL Santos City––The city government is pushing for the entry of investments on renewable energy projects to help stabilize the area’s power supply condition.

Mayor Ronnel Rivera said several investors have already signified interest to put up major power projects in the city to help address its rising power requirement.

He did not specify the type of power projects that were initially proposed to the local government but said they are leaning towards clean or renewable energy.

“We are (continuously) looking for other resources that could be put up here in the city, especially renewable energy, and there are some investors who have indicated that they want to come in,” the mayor said in an interview over TV Patrol Socsksargen.

The mayor said he met with officials of the South Cotabato II Electric Cooperative (Socoteco II) on Wednesday to discuss the power projects that are appropriate for the area.
He cited that the city government wants to make sure that Socoteco II is properly consulted when it comes to power projects as it would eventually act as their “proponent.”

Rivera said Socoteco officials assured him that the city’s power supplies are currently stable and sufficient.

“But we just want to make sure that we will have enough reserves to avoid another series of long brownouts,” he said.

Socoteco II signed in late May a power sales agreement with Miami-based power provider SoEnergy International for the augmentation of the area’s power supplies using diesel-fed modular generator units.

The two-year deal specifically provides for the operationalization of the modular generator sets and the provision of 15 megawatts (MW) of embedded power supply to the electric cooperative.

The generator sets were already installed in a property owned by Socoteco II in Barangay Apopong and is only waiting for the go-signal of the Energy Regulatory Commission so it can start operating.
In February, Socoteco II entered into a build-operate-transfer (BOT) deal with A Brown Co. Inc. (ABCI) for a 20.9 MW bunker-fired power plant in the city.

Under the agreement, ABCI’s wholly owned subsidiary Peak Power Energy Inc. will build, operate, maintain and transfer a bunker-fired power plant in the franchise area of Socoteco II over an undisclosed period. mindanews



Why Sir Chief is ‘way better’ than PNoy
Read 293 times | Posted on July 23, 2013 @ 5 years ago

By NEWSDESK.ASIA

FOR OVERSEAS Filipino workers (OFWs), the explanation is not only simple but also very personal.

Sir Chief is “handsome, charming and most of all”, the popular fictional character in Philippine TV, is “strong-willed and very considerate and kind to household workers,” according to Rey Perez Asis, program coordinator of the Hong Kong-based Asia Pacific Mission for Migrants.

But Aquino, he said, has been unsympathetic of the plight of OFWs, making him less popular compared to Sir Chief, played Filipino-Chinese actor Richard Yap.

The words of Rowena dela Cruz, a domestic worker for many years now, clearly summarized the sentiments of OFWs over the Aquino government.

“Sir Chief, even if he were just a fantasy, is something we can hold dear to our hearts. Aquino, on the other hand, is a nightmare for many of us,” said dela Cruz, who is also the vice chairperson of Gabriela-Hong Kong.

“Sir Chief is way better than Aquino,” said dela Cruz.

On Sunday, at Hong Kong’s Chater Garden, hundreds of OFWs gathered and assailed Aquino’s neglect of them–a day before the President will deliver his fourth State of the Nation Address in Manila.
More than 700 OFWs also trooped to the Philippine Consulate General (PCG) to deliver a message: the tragic state of the OFWs under the Aquino administration.

Norman Uy-Carnay of Bayan-Hong Kong said the policies of the Aquino administration “worsened poverty experienced by Filipinos, widened economic and social inequality, intensified the deprivation of social services to the people, heightened human rights violations and pushed more Filipinos to find work abroad.”

Around 200 members of Tigil Na!– or the Movement of Victims Against Illegal Recruitment and Trafficking–also participated in the action. The members of this network have experienced–and many are still experiencing–abuses and exploitative practices by recruitment agencies.

Terminated contract
A petition calling to lift the ban on direct hiring, which garnered more than 11,000 signatures from Filipino domestic workers, was also submitted to a representative of the Consulate.

“If only Aquino had an existing contract, the OFWs would have terminated it a long time ago,” said Asis, adding that the President has proven himself to like a “yellow fever virus that is just hell-bent in making us all sick.”

Aquino is expected to tell nothing but lies during his SONA, according to Asis.

“There was no genuine development for the people under Aquino’s term. Many of us want to go back home but we can’t. And the only hopes at reunion we have is when they come here to work,” he said.
So what is there to hope with Aquino’s SONA?

“He never talked about OFWs in the first place. Neither did he lift a finger to address our concerns. stranded Filipinos in KSA (Kingdom of Saudi Arabia), the deported Filipinos from Japan, the many Filipinas experiencing abuses and exploitation from recruitment agencies. So much for the “Kami ang Boss Mo” line,” Asis said.

He also cited the case of Dondon Lanuza, the OFW who remains to be in a Saudi jail even after he has been forgiven by the family of his alleged victim–and after a blood money was raised for him to pay the family. Lanuza asked Aquino government to send Philippine officials to will check on his impending release from jail in May. Lanuza has been incarcerated in Saudi for 13 years.

The problems confronting OFWs under Aquino administration, Asis said is like “halo-halong panis. Ayaw mong kahit matignan (like a spoiled halo-halo. You don’t even want to look at it).” | NewsDesk



PNoy: Philippines stopped short of being called ‘paradise’
Read 277 times | Posted on July 23, 2013 @ 5 years ago

By Azer N. Parrocha, Philippine News Agency

It was such a resounding praise for the Philippines to be given titles like ‘most romantic’, and ‘best destination’ country, said President Benigno Aquino III, during his State-of-the-Nation-Address (SONA) on Monday.

Aquino even said that he is not even surprised that the tourism industry in 2012 has reached a feat as registering 4.3 million tourist arrivals in our country, which is another new record high.
“According to the Oriental Morning Post, we are the “Best Tourism Destination of 2012,” Aquino said in his SONA.

“And it seems the Shanghai Morning Post fell in love with our country when they named us the “Most Romantic Destination of 2012,” he added.

The president mentioned other titles like a scuba diving magazine calling the country the “best diving destination.” And Palawan is the “best island”, if you ask Travel + Leisure Magazine.

“It seems they just stopped short of calling us paradise,” Aquino said.

He said that aside from the country being recognized for its beauty, one thing he took pride in was the ability of tourism to be able to generate more job opportunities.

“The DOT estimates that tourism created 3.8 million jobs in 2011,” he said. “The truth is, it is not just our scenic and most famed destinations that will profit from the arrival of tourists, but also the nearby towns that can be considered tourism support communities.”

“(Also) the places from which resorts and hotels source the food that they serve, the souvenirs that they sell, as well as other products and services that provide a source of income for our provinces,” he added.



Devoted public servant
Read 338 times | Posted on July 23, 2013 @ 5 years ago

By Tom A. Caballero and Celso Balmera of Mindanao Daily-Davao

THE new head of Sta. Cruz police station in Davao del Sur has vowed to work harder to maintain the peace and order of Sta. Cruz town.

Chief Insp. Edito S. Mandi, a policeman for seven years, was earlier appointed as chief of Sta. Cruz police station from among the five policemen endorsed to the town mayor.

Mandi was chosen for his good credentials and for his being service-oriented, the Mindanao Daily-Davao learned.

He said he will soon launch an all-out war against illegal drugs in cooperation with the local chief executive and Governor Claude Bautista.

“(The) peace and order situation of the province is highly manageable,” said Mandi adding, “we will also soon meet with the local residents of Sta. Cruz to make them aware against those people who are asking for revolutionary taxes.”

Mandi also vowed to work hand in hand with other government agencies in regard to his plan to neutralize dynamite fishing.



American starts 300-km journey to raise awareness
Read 247 times | Posted on July 23, 2013 @ 5 years ago

By Rosanna Javier
Contributor

WHILE major organizations in major cities have launched hundreds of fun runs, of varying distances, tagging many of the nation’s many charities and worthy causes as beneficiaries, a 50-year-old missionary will be taking a different route to drumming up awareness for his advocacy.

Tom Macintosh, started his journey on July 20, a 300-kilometer walk from Davao to Cagayan de Oro City, apparently to raise awareness and funds for Filipino missions in Mindanao.

The walk, which Macintosh intends to finish in 10 days, also aimed at addressing the problem of attrition which he said has been in the range of 34 percent for the last seven years.

“We have been losing our most experienced workers and the programs they manage which include schools and tutorial programs, livelihood projects, long-term disaster relief, community development, and medical-dental programs and clinics, among others,” he said.

The walk is also a call of support to individuals, businesses, and organizations to pledge any amount per kilometer hiked for the cause (e.g. P10 per km x 300 km = P3,000).

Macintosh, an American, has been residing in Mindanao since 1992 with Evelyn, his Filipina wife of 23 years and his four lovely daughters.

He started work in the Philippines as a medical missionary in Sultan Kudarat and Maguindanao.

He is the founder of Philippine Gospel Commission Foundation which to this day works among the marginalized in Shariff Aguak.

Macintosh, who speaks Tagalog and Visayan languages with the fluency of a native, is very Filipino at heart.

Having worked with Filipino missionaries and among poor Filipinos, he has come to identify with their struggles.

“When the media are no longer focusing their attention on the various problems that our Filipino missionaries encounter in the field, they (Filipino workers) are still in the field dealing with many issues,” he said adding, “sometimes we only focus on the victims and the programs and neglect the very people who take on complex challenges of implementing programs and taking care of recipients/victims.”

He said: “As time goes, these missionaries who work at grass roots development become discouraged, traumatized and many would go on with their work without trauma counseling or stress debriefing, no pastoral care and no member care support.”

Macintosh, a tennis player and scuba diving instructor, has been walking an average of 20-kilometer a day for a month now to train himself for the 300-kilometer walk.

He also carries a pack and increases its weight to get used to the 40lbs of stuff (e.g. mat, tools, change of clothes, first aid kit, and supplements) he will be carrying for 10 days.

Well wishers can walk the first few kilometers with Tom as a send off on July 20 and he would also welcome others to walk a few meters or kilometers with him at any point in his Davao-Cagayan de Oro journey.

With this event, a target of P300,000 is hoped to be raised to fund the specific needs of workers in neglected, disaster-hit and conflict areas in Mindanao, as well as to bring together a team of Filipinos trained in conflict resolution, self-care and trauma counseling.

“I hope they would focus on the cause and not just the hike.” Macintosh said.

For those interested to sponsor or make pledges, donations can be made through cash or check payable to Sultan Kudarat Philippine Gospel Commission, Inc. for Philippine Peso Donations or PGC Foundation for US Dollar Donations.

You can also visit their facebook page: “Hike for the Heroes” or, contact its facebook administrator Riza Acac Anggara.

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