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Posts Tagged ‘surigao city’





Isda hurot na, mga dinamitiro miundang na
Read 319 times | Posted on April 19, 2013 @ 5 years ago

Sinulat ni Arjay S. Felicilda, News Editor

NAHUROT na ang mga isda sa Macajalar Bay, ilabi na dapit sa bukana sa Cagayan de Oro River ug Iponan River, sumala ni Ginong Edwin Dael sa grupong Sulog.

“Ang hinungdan sa pagkawagtang sa mga isda dihang dapita mao ang walay undang pagmina sa ibabaw nga bahin sa dakbayan ginamit ang makalanag nga mercury,” matud niya.

Tungod sa pagkawagtang sa mga isda, na-undang usab ang pangdinamita dihang dapita, paniid ni Ginong Dael.

“Nalipay kita kay wala nay nagpabuto og dinamita sa Bonbon ug Bayabas, apan ang tinuod diay, wala nay nagapabuto kay wala nay isda,’ matud niya.

Napanid-an usab ni Ginong Dael nga sa pagkakaron, nagminus na ang mga mangingisda nga nagabugsay sa Macabalan (Macajalar) Bay tungod niini nga situwasyon nga resulta sa illegal nga pangmina, ilabi na sa ibabaw sa Iponan River ginamit ang mercury.

Nanghinaut siya nga mapagawas na sa Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources (BFAR) ang resulta sa ilahang imbestigasyon mahitungod sa matuod nga kahimtang sa mga isda sa nahisgotang baybayon. (uban sa report sa Bombo Radyo-Cagayan de Oro/Arjay S. Felicilda, sakop sa Mindanao Press Alliance for Sustainable Development)



4th mega job fair ends today
Read 277 times | Posted on April 19, 2013 @ 5 years ago

THE two-day mega job fair, spearheaded by the Cagayan de Oro Public Employment Office (PESO), ends today, Friday.

It was learned that 22,390 jobs will be available for overseas employment and about 12,460 for local employment.

More than 50 local companies are participating in the job fair including, Asia Brewery Inc., Coca-Cola, Marks and Spencer, Monark Equipment Corp., Pepsi-Cola;

Nestle Philippines. Pilipinas Kao, Inc.; Puyat Steel Corporation; San Miguel Purefoods; Rustan’s Shopwise; Tanduay Distillers Corp,; Sanuk, SM Department Store, Gothong Southern;

Rural Transit Mindanao, Inc.; Cagayan Corn Products; Cebu Mitsumi Inc.; Bigby’s Cafe; Del Monte Phils, Dunkin Donuts, among others.

Jobs available for local employment are for accounting graduates, agriculturist, cashiers, electricians, graphic artists, lab analysts, management trainees, machine operators, civil engineers, proof readers, full time lecturers, pharmacists, data encoders; bookkeepers; tellers; web/publication developers, among others.

Meanwhile, 32 recruitment agencies are also joining the job fair to hire nurses; x-ray and laboratory technicians, hotel staff, architects, caregivers, manicurists/pedicurists, barista/bartenders, administrative staff, welders, and others for companies overseas.

It may be recalled that the city held two job fairs in 2011, and one in 2012, which opened doors for thousands of Kagay-anons to find employment here and abroad. (LCR/asf)



Mga kawani sa PGB gipaubos sa orientation sa COMELEC
Read 250 times | Posted on April 19, 2013 @ 5 years ago

Mipahigayon ug orientation ang Commission on Elections kon COMELEC sa mga empleyado sa Provincial Capitol ning lalawigan sa Bukidnon kabahin sa Precinct Count Optical Scan (PCOS) machine kaniadtong April 12 ning tuiga didto sa Provincial Planning and Development Office kon PPDO.

Kini gitambungan sa mga nagkalain-laing kadagkuan ug representante sa matag opisina sa pagpanguna ni Acting Provincial Administrator Mercy T. Ebcas samtang ang COMELEC gipangunahan usab ni Atty. Carlito Ravelo, ang Provincial Election Supervisor ning lalawigan.

Tumong sa maong orientation nga mahatagan ug kasayuran ang mga empleyado kon unsa ang mga update ug kabag-ohan sa pagbotar ilabi na sa umaabot nga Election sa bulan sa Mayo 13, 2013 gamit ang PCOS machine.

Matud pa ni Atty. Ravelo nga ang kinatibuk-ang botante sa Pilipinas sa kasamtangan adunay 52,014,648 ka mga registered voters sa 80 ka mga probinsya, 143 ka mga syudad, 1,491 ka mga munisipyo ug 42,028 ka mga barangay. Sa kinatibuk-an, adunay 76,340 ka mga clustered precints sa tibouk nasud ug ang COMELEC nag-andam ug 82,000 ka mga PCOS machine lakip na niini ang 6,000 ka reserba kung adunay kakulian sa mga PCOS machine. Dinhi sa Bukidnon, adunay 749,526 ka mga botante ang narehistro sa COMELEC ug adunay 1,063 ka mga clustered precincts.

Gipamahayag usab ni Atty. Ravelo nga sa kasamtangang proseso, mas dali ang pagbotar ug mas dali nga mahibaw-an ang resulta sa eleksyon kon ikumpara sa milabay nga mga piniliay.

Gipasabot usab niini ang mga pamaagi sa eleksyon lakip na niini ang verification, voting, counting and canvassing ug transmission of results. Sa moderno nga pamaagi sa pagbotar, mas dali na ang verification gumikan kay biometrics na ang gigamit diin aduna na’y hulagway ug fingerprint sa mga botante. Kung sa pagbotar kaniadto isulat pa ang mga pangalan sa mga kandidato, sa kasamtangan i-shade na lamang ang oblong nga anaa sa kilid sa pangalan sa listahan sa mga kandidato nga pagapili-on.

Gipahinumduman usab ni Atty. Ravelo ang mga empleyado nga ikumpleto ang pag-shade sa balota aron kini basahon sa PCOS
machine.

Samtang sa pag-ihap sa balota, sulod sa pipila ka minuto human sa pagbotar, masayran na sa presinto ang resulta ug kini i-printa sa PCOS machine nga maoy i-panghatag sa mga official watchers. Samtang sa pag-transmit sa resulta, ang PCOS machine na ang mopadala niini gamit ang kahimanan sa internet ngadto sa Municipal, Provincial ug National Board of Canvassers lakip na niini ang Dominant Majority ug Minority. Kung ikumpara kaniadto, mokabat pa ug pipila ka bulan nga maghulat kung kinsa ang nagmadaugon, apan sa kasamtangan sulod sa pipila ka adlaw masayran na kini.

Ang piniliay magsugod sa alas 7:00 sa buntag ug matapos kini sa alas 7:00 sa kagabhion sa Mayo 13.

Una nang napasalamatan ni Gov. Alex P. Calingasan ang COMELEC sa pagpahigayon niini ug mga orientation sa mga empleyado sa probinsya aron niini masayran ang mga kabag-ohan sa pagbotar sa piniliay 2013. Kahinumduman nga mipahigayon usab ug orientation ang COMELEC niadtong bulan sa Pebrero 2013 sa mga empleyado aron masayran ang mga angayan ug gidili nga buhaton sa panahon sa kampanya.



Lanao del Norte joins ‘Operation Baklas’
Read 241 times | Posted on April 19, 2013 @ 5 years ago

By Lorry V. Gabule

ILIGAN CITY – All municipal election offices under the Commission on Elections (Comelec) Lanao del Norte Provincial Office joined the country in the simultaneous Operation Baklas held on April 8, Monday.

Atty. Joseph Hamilton Cuevas, provincial election supervisor of Lanao del Norte, said the activity was pursuant to Comelec Resolution No. 9615, otherwise known as the ‘Fair Election Act.’

Under this regulation is the strict compliance of posting of lawful election campaign or propaganda at authorized/designated common poster areas only as provided for by the Commission.

During the Operation Baklas, all election propaganda posted in the prohibited areas were removed. Given due notice of the operation were the candidates aspiring for political posts-party list/local post, the Armed Forces of the Philippines (AFP) and the Philippine National Police (PNP), the Department of Interior and Local Government (DILG), the Parish Pastoral Council for Responsible Voting (PPCRV), the National Citizens Movement for Free Elections (NAMFREL), non-government organizations (NGOs), and all concerned citizens and enjoined them to participate in the said activity.

The PNP and the AFP as counterparts of Comelec escorted the group in removing those election propaganda posted against what the law provides. The operation started at 8 a.m. in the morning until 5 p.m.

The Comelec has designated common poster areas in the city/municipal levels such as city/municipal plaza, waiting shed, barangay auditorium, basketball court, public market, back of tennis court, but never to post on trees, electrical posts.

COMELEC Resolution No. 9615 also stipulates that it is unlawful for candidates to post, display or exhibit election campaign or propaganda material outside of authorized common poster areas, in public places or in private properties without the consent of the owner.

Lawful election propaganda includes:

Pamphlets, leaflets, cards, decals, stickers or other written or printed materials the size of which does not exceed eight and one-half inches (8 ½”) in width and fourteen inches (14”) in length;
Handwritten or printed letters urging voters to vote for or against any particular political party or candidate for public office;

Posters made of cloth, paper, cardboard or any other material, whether framed or posted, with an area not exceeding two feet (2′) by three feet (3′);

Streamers not exceeding three feet (3’) by eight feet (8’) in size displayed at the site and on the occasion of a public meeting or rally. Said streamers may be displayed five (5) days before the date of the meeting or rally and shall be removed within twenty-four (24) hours after said meeting or rally;

Mobile units, vehicles motorcades of all types, whether engine or manpower driven or animal drawn, with or without sound systems or loud speakers and with or without lights.

On the other hand, Comelec Chairman Sixto S. Brillantes Jr. appeals for stringent compliance to all rules, regulations and laws relating to the conduct of free and fair elections, as candidates strongly campaign to win the vote of the electorate.

“Altogether, I am confident that the COMELEC, with the usual support and trust coming from various sectors of the society especially from the general public, will bring about another historic and successful elections,” Brillantes disclosed. (lvg/PIA10-LDN/asf)



The hopeless election legislator
Read 312 times | Posted on April 19, 2013 @ 5 years ago

Diaz

BY : CRIS DIAZ

TEARY-EYED Commissioner Sixto Brillantes of the Commissions on Elections (COMELEC) plans to resign after the Supreme Court rebuffed most contested Comelec Resolutions with the High Tribunal. The latest was the Supreme Court lifting of the controversial allowable airtime for candidates.

Under the Comelec Resolution 9615, Section 9, the candidates in national elective positions have only 120 minutes airtime on radio and television while the local candidates would have only 180 minutes airtime. Perhaps, the Supreme Court found this resolution unfair to electorates given the limited time to know and appreciate candidates. The Supreme Court, therefore, made the right decision in scrapping that resolution whose rationality only Brillantes appreciated.

Again, Section 7 of the same resolution that tackles on “prohibiting election propaganda” is another unfair resolution that the Supreme Court must look into. Under this section, it seems that all candidates are culprits. While the Comelec threatens to sue candidates perceived to have violated its provisions, the resolution did not clearly spell out possible penalties. Comelec officials would only say that they would prosecute violators in accordance with the Omnibus Election Code. The Comelec said that they could declare a candidate disqualified or send them to jail for criminal liability. What?

It seems Brillantes is making the Comelec a laughing stock. With the High Court’s rejecting the constitutionality of election laws, the electors could say that the Comelec acts like a parrot that babbles incoherently. Anyway, Brillantes said he has dreams for Comelec. Perhaps, Brillantes wants to create an image as a Commissioner who has introduced election laws of historic value.

While we appreciate Brillantes efforts to establish credible election laws, he must also take into consideration the acceptability of these laws. As a brilliant election lawyer, Brillantes knows the inherent defects of the COMELEC. However, Brillantes should remember that the laws of the COMELEC are not to please an individual ambition. There is no question that Brillantes has bright ideas in improving the existing COMELEC laws. Nevertheless, Brillantes should not succumb to the pitfall of self-aggrandizement in drafting these indispensable election laws.

Brillantes should remember that the election laws should be fair to both the candidates and the electors. If he thinks that it is hard for him to adjust to the minds of the people, then he should leave the COMELEC as he wished. As an election lawyer, Brillantes is an effective interpreter of the election laws. On the contrary, the Supreme Court sees Brillantes a hopeless election legislator.
React [email protected]



Two little words
Read 324 times | Posted on April 19, 2013 @ 5 years ago

Hurst

BY : JHAN TIAFAU HURST

THINK a minute.

A husband and wife had not spoken to each other for days.

They were still angry at one another since their last fight.

By the 5th day, the husband realized he had a problem.

He needed his wife to wake him up early the next day to catch a plane for an important business trip. But not wanting to talk to her and lose the fight, he put a note on the kitchen table.

It read: “Please wake me up at 5AM tomorrow morning.”

The next morning when the husband woke up, it was 7 o’clock! He was so angry that he had missed his plane, he was just about to yell at his wife for not waking him when he found a note next to his bed. It read: “Wake up! It’s 5 o’clock!” Why do we find it so hard to say those 2 little words, “I’m sorry”?

If we’re honest, most of us are better at remembering the people who should tell us they’re sorry than we are at paying our own “sorry” debt.

Yet if we would just apologize sooner we could save our friendships, family relationships, as well as a lot of time, energy, even money.

A British study showed that 37% of people who had sued doctors or hospitals in court would not have done it if their doctor had simply apologized to them.

You know, when it comes to taking the blame for something, most people fall into 1 of these two groups.

The first group almost never thinks that they caused any of the problem. It’s always someone else’s fault and they should apologize to you.

The second group often blame themselves for causing the problem and they apologize quickly. But both extremes of always being a blame taker or a blame shifter are not healthy.

The key in each situation is to be honest. Then admit that since it took both of you to cause the problem of offense or misunderstanding, it will probably take both of you to get out of it.

Jesus Christ promises that if we’ll give Him total control of our heart and attitude, He will help us to start seeing and understanding ourselves honestly and responsibly, so we’ll know when and how to apologize in each situation.

He’ll help you to forgive those people who wronged you, so you’ll finally be free from the heavy burden of blame.

Just Think a Minute.



Palm Oil Congress gathers 500 stakeholders in CdO
Read 462 times | Posted on April 19, 2013 @ 5 years ago

By Cheng Ordonez

SOME 500 delegates huddle with their prospective partners and investors in the industry, which produces oil palm by growing what is said to be “the best crop to overcome poverty,” during the successful opening yesterday, April 18, 2013, of the two-day 8th Palm Oil Congress, being held at the posh Xavier Sports and Country Club, Xavier Estates, Cagayan de Oro City.

Agriculture Secretary Alcala did not make it due to equally important undertaking, but Agriculture Assistant Secretary Edilberberto de Luna delivered his message at the opening program, which cited the need to have an “Oil Palm Industry Roadmap.”

“The need to have an updated Oil Palm Industry Roadmap is now inevitable since situations have changed and we must be relevant to the times. PCA (Philippine Coconut Authority) Administrator Euclides G. Forbes has told me that in 2004, an Oil Palm Roadmap was made and, in fact, was presented during one of your National Palm Oil Congresses. If it did not take off the ground, there must be a problem or problems. And in my term, I cannot allow that to happen again,” Sec. Alcala in his message, delivered by Asec. De Luna, said.

Alcala also said that he directed PCA to prepare the roadmap for the industry and was happy to know that two weeks from now, a Consultation-Workshop on Harmonization of Data and Statistics on the Philippine Palm Oil Industry will be held by the PCA in Davao City.

“I expect that with the harmonized data, we will finally come up with a roadmap for the industry. One that is achievable within a timeframe of 10 years from 2013 to 2023,” Alcala’s message said.

For his part, Dr. Pablito Pamplona, PPDCI director and secretary, said: “If we look at the situation of our country now, we are like (Manny) Pacquiao. We are down. To overcome the huge vegetable oil shortage of the country is necessary. In addition, there is the urgent need to promote high farm productivity, generate employment opportunities and help reduce the incidence of poverty with the use of Oil Palm following what the neighboring countries has done as models.”

The 8th National Oil Palm Congress on April 18-19, 2013, has been organized by A Brown Company, Inc., through its subsidiary A Brown Energy Resources Development Inc. (ABERDI), which plays host to this year’s event, under the leadership of Robertino Pizarro, who is both president of the Philippine Palm Oil Development Council Inc (PPDCI) and A Brown Company.

Pizarro delivered the rationale of the congress with focus on this year’s theme, “Utilizing unproductive lands and promoting economic stability thru investments in the palm oil industry.”

Ruffy Magbanua, manager, community relations and development of A Brown Copany, said this is the first time that a Palm Oil Congress gathered this big number of delagates, and considered it as a successful gathering of local and foreign key players in the oil palm industry.

“Top industry keyplayers in attendance aside from Pizarro were Erwin Garcia, PPDCI vice president, Reynaldo Espanola, PPDCI director, Dr. Pablito Pamplona, director and secretary of PPDCI, among others.

Cagayan de Oro City Mayor Vicente Emano, graced the opening program. He also inducted into office the board of directors of PPDCI.

The Palm Oil Congress is co-sponsored by the Local Government of Cagayan de Oro, ABERDI, API Group of Companies, KIDI, FPPI, Land Bank of the Philippines (LBP), Department of Agriculture (DA) and other major industry players, with the support of the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI), Regional Board of Investments (RBOI), Department of Trade and Industry (DTI), PCA–PODO, Department of Tourism (DOT), (Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) and other stakeholders.

Updates on the Philippine palm oil industry, development initiatives, technological advances, banking support, local and international trends and prospects among others will be discussed during the congress were readily available during the two-day congress.

ABERDI operates a 1,500-hectare palm oil plantation in Kalabugao, Impasug-ong, Bukidnon and Tingalan, Opol, Misamis Oriental and soon in Tignapoloan, Cagayan de Oro City.

ABERDI also operates a 10-tonner crude palm oil plant in Impasug-ong, Bukidnon. By June this year, the 50-tonner palm oil refinery plant will be operational and is expected to produce 1,000 metric tons of palm oil per month. (With a report from Karen Liñan, MasCom Intern, Liceo University)

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